Jump to content


Photo

Intro To Solvent Welding Plastic


30 replies to this topic

#26 Zorns Lemma

Zorns Lemma

    Sir Scrt

  • Moderators
  • 1,274 posts
  • Location:Dulles International Airport
  • State:Virginia
  • Country:United States

Posted 31 March 2010 - 03:37 AM

Here's a question which I think could be very helpful:

When should you solvent weld plastics as opposed to gluing them together?


Pretend you're working with aluminum and ask "would I rather weld this, solder/braze it, or use jb weld?" which correspond roughly to solvent weld, hot glue/ca glue, and epoxy respectively in terms of working with thermoplastics.
  • 0
"In short, the same knowledge that underlies the ability to produce correct judgement is also the knowledge that underlies the ability to recognize correct judgement. To lack the former is to be deficient in the latter."
Kruger and Dunning (1999)

#27 Lt Stefan

Lt Stefan

    Member

  • Members
  • 892 posts
  • Location:Hunterdon County, NJ
  • State:New Jersey
  • Country:United States

Posted 31 March 2010 - 09:37 AM

I had an idea for applying solvents. Plastic syringes will obviously break down after a few uses, and I don't want to keep buying them. I figured something made of glass would be better, and coincidentally in Bio class I noticed the glass eye droppers. I'm thinking of getting a few to use instead because I'll be able to rinse and reuse them. I won't be able to tell how much I'm using, as there are no measurements, but I don't really care about that anyway. Does this sound like it would work?
  • 0

#28 Guest_Just Some Bob_*

Guest_Just Some Bob_*
  • Guests

Posted 31 March 2010 - 10:19 AM

I figured something made of glass would be better, and coincidentally in Bio class I noticed the glass eye droppers. I'm thinking of getting a few to use instead because I'll be able to rinse and reuse them.



That should do quite well for all liquid solvents without thickeners. You probably won't have to worry about rinsing, since most such solvents evaporate clean.

Anything with fillers or plastic already dissolved in it will leave those behind, and you may need a clear version of the same solvent(s) to clean it. For those I prefer something like disposable brushes, which I sometimes see 10-to-20 to the pack at the dollar store, or popsicle sticks, which are even cheaper, and easily carved to a finer point if needed.
  • 0

#29 Lt Stefan

Lt Stefan

    Member

  • Members
  • 892 posts
  • Location:Hunterdon County, NJ
  • State:New Jersey
  • Country:United States

Posted 31 March 2010 - 03:33 PM

Does IPS #3 have a filler? If it doesn't could the droppers potentially be used indefinitely?
  • 0

#30 TantumBull

TantumBull

    Member

  • Members
  • 1,879 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA
  • State:Washington
  • Country:United States

Posted 31 March 2010 - 04:05 PM

I've used it at school and its thinner than water. So if there is a filler, there's a negligible amount of it.
  • 0

#31 Zorns Lemma

Zorns Lemma

    Sir Scrt

  • Moderators
  • 1,274 posts
  • Location:Dulles International Airport
  • State:Virginia
  • Country:United States

Posted 31 March 2010 - 11:36 PM

According to their MSDS, IPS #3 is less than 1% of dissolved acrylic.

And seriously guys, this shit isn't hard to find on the internet. Background in organic and polymer chemistry helps with the theory of how all of this crap works, but the actual mechanics are listed pretty extensively. L2google.

Edited by Zorn's Lemma, 31 March 2010 - 11:38 PM.

  • 0
"In short, the same knowledge that underlies the ability to produce correct judgement is also the knowledge that underlies the ability to recognize correct judgement. To lack the former is to be deficient in the latter."
Kruger and Dunning (1999)


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users