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Front Page Update: May

Upcoming Nerf Wars, Homemade Contest, New Dart Cutters and more....

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#1 Langley

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 11:09 AM

Front Page Update is back for the summer. Catch up on everything that's been going on since last summer. Think we missed something? Post it in the comments!

May14Cover.jpg

Upcoming Nerf Wars:
[CA] SCUNPREP 2 May 3rd
[GA] Next GA Nerf War May 3rd
[WI] Green Bay War May 3rd
[WI] Milwaukee Area Nerf Outing S.S. 2/10 May 4th
[KY] Post-Derby War May 4th
[NJ] Babbage Park 0517 May 17th
[IL] Mayhem 3.0 Central IL Nerf War May 17th
[PA] Sex(Dwarf) Up Your Spring June 7th
[CA] Armageddon June 21st <<< Biggest Annual West Coast Summer War
[CT] NENO 8 July 5th
[NJ] Apocalypse 2014 August 2nd <<< Biggest Annual East Coast Summer War
[OH] Ohio Revolution II: Redcoats Revenge September 13th
To get your war posted on the main page, submit your planning thread to the 2016 Nerf War Schedule.

Contests
There's only about a month left to get your entries in for the Noob's Fist Homemade Contest. We're trying to find the writeup that will become the go-to design for new nerfers who want to build their first homemade. Submit your entries before June 1st. Don't be afraid to ask for help from the moderators and admins if you need it, and don't forget to take Meaker up on his offer to help with diagrams.

Featured Trading Threads
Pre-cut beige dart blanks - Pre-straightened, Pre-cut beige foam from Shmmee
Snickers' 3-D Printing Service - 3D printed plunger heads, grips, and accessories.

Click here to read more, including:Previously on NerfHaven, Nerf Facts, and a Discussion Topic...
Don't forget to follow us on Facebook and Twitter to keep up with front page updates and announcements.
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You can poop in my toilet anytime champ.

2016 Nerf War Schedule
Bless you, my son. Now recite 3 New Members Guides and 5 Code of Conducts for your sins.


#2 Langley

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 11:10 AM

Previously, on NerfHaven...
Here's what you missed if you haven't been around since last summer.

Nerf Facts
  • The different sizes of PVC pipe were originally based on the inside diameter of common steel pipe from that time period. As pipe thickness changed and pipe was standardized based on outside diameter, the relationship between the nominal pipe size and actual pipe size disappeared entirely.
  • For about four years in the late nineties, all Nerf blasters in production had some sort of animal theme.
  • Before the dawn of the current fascist dictatorship, NerfHaven was slated to be a community moderated board based on the system used by Slashdot, the precursor to Digg and Reddit. The plan for this system can be found in topic #4 Topics 1-3 are lost to time, but historians believe that they were mainly about the relative sizes of the founders' genitals.

Discussion Topic
This month's topic is going to be a little self serving. After moving to another state, away from my Hackerspace, I find myself without a well-stocked workshop for the first time in my life. So, what are the essential tools of a nerfer? What's worth splurging on? What's better to cheap out on? Manufacturers and specific models are appreciated.
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You can poop in my toilet anytime champ.

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#3 orangeparkour

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 11:16 AM

I love the drill press in my workshop, saves a lot of trouble having straight holes. A good quality caulk gun for dart making also helps. Sorry I don't have names or specifics.
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#4 hoongfu

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 12:09 PM

I use a $30 rotary tool with a bunch of bits from Costco while Koree uses a $80 Dremel tool. His lasted over 5-7 years I think and mine is going on 3 years. I think it's ok to skimp out on tools that don't necessary interface with the materials directly. But I would say pay some money for the parts that actually touch the materials like a special PVC cutting bit. Koree has one and it goes through pvc like a lightsaber.
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#5 Daniel Beaver

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 02:52 PM

The tools I list in my writeups I consider essential:

Tools
- Power drill
- Drill bits to go with it (1/16", 1/4", 1/2", etc)
- Screwdrivers (a cordless screwdriver is very nice to have)
- Tapping tool
- Tapping bits to go with it (6-32, 8-32, 1/4")
- Rotary tool (dremel, multispeed)
- Reinforced cutting disk
- Sanding bit
- Diamond cutting wheel (better for cutting plastics)
- Wood cutting wheel
- Hammer
- Utility knife
- Pipe cutter
- Three-sided drafter's ruler
- A mechanical pencil with a pointy shaft
- Two hot glue guns - one hot, one cold


Consumables
- epoxy putty
- PVC cement
- superglue
- silicone grease
- zip-ties
- hot glue
- duct tape
- aluminum tape

Edited by Daniel Beaver, 02 May 2014 - 02:52 PM.

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#6 TED

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 07:20 PM

Snubbed again.
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#7 snickers

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 08:01 PM

If possible a 3d printer.
I have a black and Decker bandsaw
Craftsman scroolsaw
Craftsman Drill press
Solidoodle 3 3d printer
Like mentioned above, pretty much any dremel would do. I would keep away from the $5 harbor freight dremel. The $15 dremel at Menards is great. So is the dremel from Costco. Costco sells a bunch of tool "kits". The Dremel kit comes with a great dremel and over $150 worth of bits for only $20. I'll post more when I have more time.
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#8 Mully

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 01:44 PM

- A Dremel comes to mind first; it's been essential in nearly every mod I've ever done. A good one will last you for a long time; I recommend getting a dremel 3000, from the dremel company. It's the perfect mixture of size and portability, in my opinion.

- A drill, and all sorts of bits. The drill can be of mediocre quality, as long as it doesn't burn out, it'll work for modding.

- A drill press and scroll saw, if you're into making home mades. I own a scroll saw, not a drill press, so someone else will have to help you out in that department. Regarding scroll saws, I have one from Craftsman, and it's served me well. I believe it's the same Snickers has.

- Glue. A glue gun and ammo, superglue, Oatie's pipe cement, epoxy putty, JB weld, etc. The better the quality here, the longer your blasters will last.

- General tools: A rubber mallet (whatever you can find), a hammer, plyers, scissors, a soldering iron, if you're into electric stuff, price depending on how into that you are; a razor blade and various screwdrivers (flat and philips); you can go get cheap stuff here too, and bastard files of appropriate size.

Safety equipment:

Rubber gloves, a respirator, (get the best you can here), glasses/goggles, whatever you think is necessary. Don't skimp here, safety takes priority.

Other materials:

Lubricant: I use Lucas Oil White Lithium grease; it comes in huge tubes at the Home Depot. Silicon grease, I use Superlube. It works well for modding blasters, as it spreads thinner than Lithium grease.
Rags, teflon tape, electrical tape, a ruler, various pvc pipe sizes and fittings,polycarbonate, and other such raw materials.


That's all I can think of for now, I'll add more later if I can think of anything else.

Edited by Mully, 03 May 2014 - 01:52 PM.

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#9 Majestic

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 02:02 PM

The first thing that comes to mind when I think of a well stocked workshop is a good work bench. As an audio engineer and guitar tech I needed a mobile workstation so I bought this a few years ago. It has been all over the world with me and never let me down once. I donít tour anymore and this workbox has transitioned smoothly into modding. The table is sturdy and at the right height and I can dig into the drawers for all of my tools and supplies without getting up from the chair.

A foot controlled rotary tool with a flexible shaft like a Fordom or this is also really nice. They have much larger motors than normal "Dremel" style hand held models and can deliver the torque you always wanted without having to control some whirling electric motor in your hand while you are doing delicate work.
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#10 Meaker VI

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 10:32 AM

I agree, a good bench is just as important as the tools. You can buy some Simpson ties specifically for bench building and throw something together with 2x4's and plywood for $100 or so. I'd say a drillpress or drill guide + drill is about the most important power tool you can get; I rarely use a dremel for anything and do most of my PVC cutting with regular hand saws. You can get drill bits that sand and grind, and you can slap a straight router bit in there to cut slots if you have to and you're not cutting anything harder than plastic. Disclaimer - I don't own a drillpress, but do have a drill guide. I think a drill press will be my next purchase though.

Personally, I greatly prefer a band saw to a scroll saw.
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#11 Aeromech

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 05:17 PM

The first thing that comes to mind when I think of a well stocked workshop is a good work bench.



I agree, a good bench is just as important as the tools.


Built one for around $60-$70 last summer with some Home Depot lumber and supplies and have used it on every build since. This paired with a small vice is super helpful. My work space does not allow me to have large machines, and I am very space limited. I don't know your exact situation, Langley, but in my experience I can get by with the following:

Bench with vice
Electric Drill with set of drill bits
Long-shaft screwdriver (from Radioshack or Home Depot)
Taps with tap wrench if you're working with Polycarb
Hacksaw
Course Rasp
Less-course rasp
Rat-tail File
Knife of your choice
Countersink


Keep in mind I have built freakin' Rainbows using only these tools. Hole-saws and drill presses are not necessary but damn it they are sweet if you are in the possession of one. If you lack the space or the funds for more efficient machines, these have kept me afloat just fine.
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#12 Langley

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 08:46 PM

Thanks for all the suggestions.

Definitely putting either Majistic's Flexible Shaft Grinder or the Proxxon Rotary Tool at the top of my list. I've done just fine with an $18 Harbor Freight rotary tool but I would much rather have something that's going to last now that I'm not sharing it. I think the only good rule of thumb for rotary tools and nerf is that you should never get a cordless rotary tools. They have no torque and they always run out of batteries halfway through a project.

That crazy case for audio equipment is a little out of my price range. I was thinking of something more along the lines of the Harbor Freight workbench or this DIY workbench.

I've got a tool box full of hand tools that includes items like:
Screw drivers
Hack saw
Coping saw with different blades for metal wood and plastic
Hammer
Files and rasps of various sizes shapes and grades
Sand paper and emery cloth (essential to good wooden handles)
Dust mask
Shop goggles
Measuring tape and calipers.
Razor knife
Duct tape, electrical tape, strapping tape, hockey tape/grip tape, packing tape
Needle nose pliers
Lineman's pliers
Ratcheting clamps
Corded drill (for similar reasons to above rant about cordless rotary tools.
Drill bits


Items that I don't have that walked off or got donated to my old makerspace:
Zip Ties
Epoxy putty
PVC cement/primer
Wire of various gauges
Nails/brads
Diagonal cutter
Hole punch/awl
Ratcheting PVC cutter
metal tubing cutter
countersink bits
pop rivet gun.
3D printer (good riddance. Fuck makerbot)


One thing I haven't seen listed is a shop vac. If you're in a basement or apartment workshop, particularly when you are cohabitating, having a shop vac is pretty important to the continued existence of your workshop area.

Definitely thinking about a drill press, along with tooling like a good vice, drill bits, hole saw, etc.

I should probably get a tap and die set, although I've gone without using one up until now. That's sort of at the bottom of my list.
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You can poop in my toilet anytime champ.

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Bless you, my son. Now recite 3 New Members Guides and 5 Code of Conducts for your sins.


#13 Meaker VI

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 11:02 AM

That crazy case for audio equipment is a little out of my price range. I was thinking of something more along the lines of the Harbor Freight workbench or this DIY workbench.


Here is a link to the simpson ties I was talking about. I think you can get a kit for $40 from HD that builds a good bench, but you need to supply lumber (I just bought individual ties off the rack at HD, and cost of lumber + ties + screws for mine was around $125). The plus side of that is you can build it as big/small as you want - I built one that takes up the whole back wall of my garage and my rolling work table nests inside.

One thing I haven't seen listed is a shop vac. If you're in a basement or apartment workshop, particularly when you are cohabitating, having a shop vac is pretty important to the continued existence of your workshop area.


Probably true, if your shop doesn't have impervious floors that you can just sweep. This tiny $25 shopvac from Lowes has served me well so far and costs roughly the same as a broom.

I should probably get a tap and die set, although I've gone without using one up until now. That's sort of at the bottom of my list.


I think widespread use of these is attributable to Captain Slug's using them. I doubt they're really needed for anything, as most plastics (and woods) are soft enough that your screws/bolts should self-tap. I've never used one on PVC or wood projects, but I haven't used polycarb yet so maybe they are more important for that.
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#14 snakerbot

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 11:11 AM

I think widespread use of these is attributable to Captain Slug's using them. I doubt they're really needed for anything, as most plastics (and woods) are soft enough that your screws/bolts should self-tap. I've never used one on PVC or wood projects, but I haven't used polycarb yet so maybe they are more important for that.


Machine screws self tap in PVC just fine. You should be using wood screws, not machine screws in wood, so the tapping question shouldn't even be a question at all. Polycarbonate self taps alright, but it isn't pleasant, and I would always recommend using a tap set on it.
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