Jump to content


Photo

Pump-action SNAP 3.0 Write-up

I hope I don’t offend anyone by making this write-up
homemade writeup pumpaction SNAP spring

15 replies to this topic

#1 Naturalman7

Naturalman7

    Member

  • Contributors
  • 158 posts
  • Location:Boise, Idaho
  • State:Idaho
  • Country:United States

Posted 23 January 2014 - 08:09 PM

Derrikk J. Sun
January 17, 2014
 

Pump-action SNAP 3.0 Write-up
I hope I don’t offend anyone by making this write-up
All pictures are mine unless otherwise stated

yQvKBZu.jpg

This is an extremely long, fully detailed, picture-heavy write-up. The sheer length of it may discourage anyone thinking about following it and it might be confusing at first, so try to read it more than once before undertaking. While it’s a fairly simple, step-by-step guide, it’s also fully comprehensive. This guide assumes the reader has at least an elementary knowledge of basic reasoning and understanding. Any terms or phrases not defined in the write-up itself can be found in the glossary. This write-up uses the term ‘gun’ and ‘blaster’ interchangeably. Apologies if this write-up is too long.


This write-up is broken into a number of sections. If there's a way to link to a certain line of text in a single post, someone please do let me know.


Each section is bolded in title and ends with a horizontal line. First tier writing is bolded and italicized. Steps are underlined. Substeps (#.# steps) are just italicized.



 

Table of Contents

Spoiler


 

Intro

There is definitely a plethora of different, all effective, pump-action, war-worthy blasters out there, but few are simple to understand and have easy to follow guides on how to build them. This blaster is not new or original, but searches for “SNAP 3.0” have yielded no results when looking for a good write-up. This design’s credit goes to TheNerfOmania. When searching for a guide I could follow, I did not find one, but I saw his design on YouTube and liked its simplicity, so I used it as a basis for the design in this write-up (TheNerfOmania). Props to you NoM for sharing your work.

 

Purpose

To create a step-by-step guide to building a pump-action SNAP 3.0 that not only explains what to do, but teaches the reason behind why each step is taken and is done the way described so that those fairly new to building homemade Nerf guns or those with less experience can construct a reliable blaster and understand the ideas behind some practices and techniques. As such, terms and definitions will be explained throughout this guide.

 

Overview

The final product will be a full length (11” long) [k26] spring powered pump-action homemade blaster. [k26] refers to the part number of the spring (which is 9637K26) as available through McMaster.com, an industrial and commercial supply company. The draw length (amount of length of the prime) is 6” with .5” pre-compression of the spring at rest. The blaster is not dry-fire safe (fire-able without a dart in the barrel), but sturdy and easy to disassemble and repair when necessary. The overall length is ~19”. Performance is on-par with similarly powered blasters, achieving a range of ~100-120’ with the ideal barrel length with a 10 dart/1’ hopper of ~16” (see the barrel subsection for an explanation).

 

Cost

The cost of a PumpSNAP 3.0 can vary greatly depending on what is used as handles. If the cost of the handle is excluded, the total price per blaster is ~$18.65. This value also excludes the cost of a roofing nail and clothespin which were obtained for free in this write-up. The total cost for all raw materials is $63.24. A Maverick’s cost would need to be added to these costs if one is to be used. The price if using wood for handles instead of a Maverick would be much less, but would also be necessary to take into account if used.

The figures used in these calculations can be found from this spreadsheet: PumpSNAP 3.0 cost sheet (Sun). The table is also included below. Usage of each part is explained in the write-up.

Spoiler


 

Materials

Spoiler


 

Tools

Spoiler


 

Procedure

The main event.

The order that the steps appear in is the order that I’ve found to be the easiest. But I’m no professional. As long as you have a bowl before you pour the milk or the cereal, it doesn’t really matter which is poured first. With that being said, let’s begin.



[b]Main Body



Step #1: Measuring and marking the main body

If you’ve gathered all the parts and cut all the sections of pipe before starting, as I’d assume one would do, then the first step is simply to figure out where the heck everything is supposed to go. When designing or building a homemade, before I do anything, I would draw a picture. Pictorial representations are always easier to understand than mental images or long blocky segments of text. Click “show spoiler” to view.

Spoiler


The picture really only helps if you care to understand what is happening as you build it, as I hope you do. Basically, we know the [k26] spring is going to be the ‘powerhouse’ of the blaster, and given the amount of draw we chose, we we’ll build off of and around that. Why a 6” draw? Because too much is difficult and annoying to use, and too little is both a waste of spring, another step if you choose to cut the spring, and isn’t as powerful competitively. Further explanation explained below.

Spoiler




This is the ~22” of thickwall 1-1/4” PVC.

mJwsLE3.jpg

A note about PVC, get the right PSI rating. A higher rating means thicker walls. The correct pipe would be 480 PSI. Don’t use anything with thinner walls. The inner diameter of lower PSI-rated pipe is too large to form a seal with the rubber washers and is also not strong enough to handle repeated impacts. On the first homemades I built, I used 160 PSI pipe and the front ends cracked and blew off when I fired it.



If you have the right pipe, make a mark at every critical point where a hole needs to be drilled, you should mark after measuring at least twice. These points would be ~5/8” from the very front, 7.75” from the front, 12.5” from the front, 13.5”, and 19.5”.

kOZ1niC.jpg

The first mark is for two set screws that will be used to secure the front bushing, the second for the hole in the main body for the catch nail, the third for two more set screws to hold the ¾ PVC end cap in place to act as a spring stop, and the last two for drilling, cutting, grinding and filing the slots for the priming slide. I’ll explain each part more in-depth as they appear later.



Using this fancy tool made out of a 1-1/4” PVC fitting (credit to Daniel Beaver from his Quixote guide), the sides of the pipe can be accurately marked (Beaver). I also use this to make my marks around the circumference of the pipe in the previous step. I’ll borrow some pictures from him to get the point across better (it’s also a really great write-up, btw).

 

...

In order to mark the other side accurately, I made a little guide tool. I cut off an edge of a 1-1/4” coupler, and then made marks on all the compass points. This slips snuggly onto the plunger tube, and allows me to accurately mark the opposite edge.

9.jpg

10.jpg

11.jpg


And one poor quality one of mine:

5EB5EWZ.jpg


You could also take it a step further and make one of these: a perfect PVC quarter marking jig that was also used by NoM (Phoenix66).




Step #2: Orientating the blaster and nail hole


At this point, decide where the top and bottom of the blaster will be. I like to put any text on the pipe on the bottom side of the blaster. Drill a 9/64” hole for the roofing nail perpendicular (straight) into body.

RUFaLoj.jpg


Hopefully you’ve read a little bit about how clothespin triggers work. If not, here’s a brief explanation. The nail will sit against the PVC in this hole until the clothespin is opened and the nail retracted. The nail, when pulled down, releases the firing mechanism. This process will be further explained later.



After the bottom of the blaster is marked by the hole, I find it best to mark this bottom with a line along the length of the pipe. I use this engineer’s ruler (credit to Beaver again for this) to draw a line perfectly parallel to the body of the blaster (Beaver).

 

...I highly suggest using a three-sided ruler for these, since you can lay it flat against the curve of the tube and make very straight lines. First, draw a centerline all the way down the side of the tube.

3.jpg
 


And another one of mine:

3laBVVk.jpg




Then, mark the sides perpendicular to the bottom using the same measuring tool and align it so the bottom stays on bottom.


Mark the front…

18jjSFm.jpg



Second to last…

WidY0Gx.jpg



…and last line on either side.

gh6yT5U.jpg


The first is for the front bushing and the last are for the priming slide slots.




Then measure ¼” wide (or 1/8” from either side of the last two marks) and draw straight lines to form rectangles on either side of the body. These will be the priming slide slots on the back end of the blaster.

LocabQj.jpg






Step #3: Making priming slide slots

Doing this step right reduces a lot of friction on the priming slide. Doing it properly makes the blaster look very clean, and neat and ensures that the priming bolts slide evenly and smoothly.



Take a ¼” drill bit and drill where the ends of the slots are as pictured:

hRNi9sy.jpg



Drill all the way through and the two sides should line up. If they’re a little crooked, wiggle the bit around so the holes align perpendicularly to the body.

TzIYLwV.jpg



Next, using whatever method you choose, cut out those slots. I use a rotary tool.

ztIQ5TS.jpg



To quote a better man than myself:
 

.... I recommend a diamond cutting wheel for this job, as it works a lot better than other cutting wheels.

cutting_slots_1.jpg[/url]

cutting_slots_2.jpg


ztIQ5TS.jpg


I happen to come across a diamond cutting wheel when borrowing a Dremel from a friend. They do work very well.


EjeWAZg.jpg



A quick side note about this step: it’s pretty common for pump-action blasters to require cutting long slots like these. The easiest way is to just invest in a quality rotary tool. However, if you choose not to buy a Dremel, there’s still plenty of hope and I won’t expressly require a Dremel or rotary tool. Carbon shared an innovative way to make these slots using a drill and some sanding/filing/cleaning up (Carbon).



...

I used a new slot making method this time: I drilled out holes, and then connected them with a sanding drum. it works, and works well.
rV4hh5O.jpg
 


After having drilled and cut these slots, you’ll probably end up with (especially if you used a Dremel) a lot of PVC dust and other debris inside your blaster. This is bad. If left alone, it will literally clog up your blaster and ruin your seal and washers. This would be an ideal time to rinse out your blaster. This will be the last heavy tooling step on the main body and it can also be set aside at this time.

 


Edited by Aeromech, 23 November 2015 - 03:13 AM.

  • 0

#2 Naturalman7

Naturalman7

    Member

  • Contributors
  • 158 posts
  • Location:Boise, Idaho
  • State:Idaho
  • Country:United States

Posted 23 January 2014 - 08:18 PM

Plunger Rod

This is common terminology found among the popular Nerf community. A ‘plunger rod’ is simply the shaft that the seal, catch, and priming systems are attached to. I wasn’t around when the original terminology started being used, but I’d assume this stems from similarly named parts in plumbing.

I honestly can’t remember if I did the plunger rod next, or the order I did what in for this build, but I’ve found that I like to do components that need drying/curing time first to cut down a little bit on the amount of waiting required. I get overexcited and impatient otherwise.



Step #1: Spacers (aka Trekkies)

Snippet about these next few steps: The first time a made one of these, the CPVC had a slightly smaller inner diameter and the spacers had a slightly larger outer diameter and they fit into each other with a lot of friction and required a bit of hammering to fit. The fit was enough that no other work was necessary, and I could skip to the next step. However, and I’d assume in most cases, a method of attachment other than friction would be needed. And since friction is not a very large force in most cases, we’ll move right into this step. (iModify).


Take both the 1” long nylon spacers. The nylon spacer’s inner diameter (ID) will be too small for ¼-20 screws, so drill them wider with a 15/64” drill bit. Please use power tools responsibly if you have not been already. Use a clamp or pliers to hold the work piece as you drill. Trying to hold it in your hand would only work for select few individuals – Chuck Norris, for example.

Posted Image




Take the CPVC and push in the two 1” long nylon spacers, one in either end. These spacers will be the anchor points for the two ends of the rod.

Posted Image




Measure ¾” from either end of the CPVC…

Posted Image



…and drill two more 15/64” holes approximately halfway through the plunger rod. Then add some set screws.

Posted Image Posted Image


I use set screws here because I’ve found that just friction fitting the components together does not hold up if accidentally dry-fired. You could just glue the spacers into the CPVC with PVC cement and it would work just as well, but I like not using glue so I can disassemble as much as possible for whatever reason I may want to. Not using glue also means you don’t have to worry about having to wait for it to dry. Placing the screws far enough down in the spacers is so that the machine screws can screw in all the way without hitting the set screw.



After the spacers are anchored properly, you may want to sand the CPVC where there may be some rough spots form the drilling and screwing. The rod should be smooth and even to ensure low friction, but if you choose not to, the slight increase in friction shouldn’t make a large difference. I’m just a little obsessive-compulsive about making things as perfect as possible.

Posted Image Posted Image




Step #2: Plunger head

I like to work on the plunger head first, so set the CPVC assembly aside. The plunger head is what creates the seal in the PVC and acts as the catch plate.


We’ll first create the plunger head, or PH, by taking the ½” CPVC end cap and drilling a 15/64” hole as centered as we can. One way to get the hole centered is to put a section of ½” CPVC on the end cap and a sharpie should fit near centered in it. I’m not sure where I saw this first, but if I find out where, I’ll add it.

Posted Image Posted Image


The self-centering sharpie should make a dot near perfectly in the middle of the cap.

Posted Image



Then simply drill the 15/64” hole.

Posted Image

This cap will act as the spring stop for the front of the plunger rod and will also serve as a base to build the epoxy putty ramp on. I’ll explain more about what all this means after we have assembled more onto the plunger rod.



Push the CPVC end cap onto the end of the CPVC rod. It does not matter which end it’s on, but this end will now be the front of the plunger. The hole in the end cap should line up with the hole in the nylon spacer.

Posted Image



Assemble the plunger head onto the 1/4-20 1-1/4” long machine screw by putting the ¾” washer, 1-1/4” rubber washer, 1-1/2” rubber washer, 1-1/4” fender washer, nylon spacer, and finally another 1-1/4” fender washer on in that order.

Posted Image Posted Image


Before moving on, a note about the ¾” washer. I did not have one with the correct ID, but for some reason, I really felt like using a ¾” washer. It seemed to be the size that worked best. Maybe your experience is different, but I dunno. Anyway, I had to drill a larger ID in my washer.

I just held the washer with a pair of pliers and drilled a larger, ¼”, ID.

Posted Image Posted Image


It’s easiest if you drill one side, and then the other until you make it all the way through. Nothing too fancy or difficult, but drilling washers can be a useful skill I think.


Screw this entire assembly onto the front of the plunger rod. When tightened properly, the washers should make a slight ‘cup’ shape.

Posted Image Posted Image


This cup shape creates an effective air seal moving forward, but also has low friction and vents air moving backward which prevents darts from being accidentally sucked from the barrel into the pressure-chamber/air-chamber/body of the blaster (Lemma).

Spoiler

The rubber washer seal can also be replaced by other sealing methods such as u-cup seals (skirt seals), o-ring seals, or grommet seals, but rubber washers are probably the easiest, cheapest, and most commonly used.




Step #2.1: Plunger head catch ramp


The catch ramp.

The roofing nail will slide up this ramp and into the slot between the two fender washers at the front of the plunger. The nail will sit against the fender washer until moved downward from a pull of the trigger, release the spring, and the blaster will fire.


To make the catch ramp, remove a section of epoxy putty from the stick and knead it until it becomes uniform in color; it should also become warmer as the chemical reaction occurs.

Posted Image



Apply the putty to the ½” CPVC end cap and form a ramp shape along the end cap, as shown. This shouldn’t be too difficult, especially anyone with experience with Play-Doh or clay. I like the ramp to start from the base of the CPVC end cap and end at the top of the first fender washer.

Posted Image Posted Image


Just so there’s no further confusion about what happens here, this is an informative post by Carbon about how SNAP triggers work (Carbon):

There always seems to be a bit of confusion about exactly how SNAP triggers work. Fair enough, half of the mechanism is hidden inside the plunger tube, and I can't see anyone shelling out for a transparent SNAP anytime soon. There was a request for diagrams of a SNAP trigger over at the HQ, so I made these up.

Here's the plunger at rest:
Posted Image

Plunger at mid-draw:
Posted Image

Primed and ready to fire:
Posted Image




Step #3: Spring Stop

After the plunger head is mounted properly and curing, take a look at the ¾” PVC end cap. This is the spring stop. The spring will rest against this and will compress against this when primed. A 5/8” hole needs drilled in this and the sides need sanded down so that it fits without resistance in the main body. The plunger rod will slide through this, and needs to do so without friction.


Take the end cap and drill a centered 5/8” hole. I haven’t found a real great way for this, but the end cap is bowled slightly and, if done gently, the bit may rest at the bottom of the fitting and be centered. Test fit the end cap with the CPVC. If there’s a lot of resistance when sliding through, sand, file, or drill the ID a little more. Don’t go overboard on the sanding. If the ID is sanded too wide, the spring may get caught between the CPVC and end cap and jam. Once that is done, sand the fitting so it fits inside the 1-1/4” PVC. It should fit with little resistance.

Here is a picture of what the finished fitting should end up looking somewhat like:

Posted Image Posted Image




Step #4: Plunger Assembly


The plunger rod is almost done. Just slide on the [k26] spring, the finished ¾” PVC end cap, and screw on the last 1-1/4” OD fender washer with a ¼-20 3/4” machine screw to top it all off. The spring should rest against the ¾” end cap and ½” CPVC end cap on either end.

Posted Image


A quick autopsy of the plunger rod workings: the rubber washers, again, create the seal. The metal washers and nylon spacers at the front act as the ‘retaining’ feature for the nail when the blaster is primed. The nail travels up the ramp and into the gap of the two washers. The PVC end cap acts as the stop for the spring which it compresses against. The metal washer at the very end of the plunger rod is the ‘priming disk’. The priming bolts connected to the priming slide or pump slide push against this disk to prime the blaster. This entire thing is held together by the two set screws, nylon spacers, and ¼-20 machine screws. NerfoMania originally used a polycarbonate disk as the priming disk, but a fender washer is easier and requires less work because there is no need to create a circle cut out of polycarbonate (iModify).




Trigger

This is the standard SNAP trigger mechanism, the clothespin and roofing nail combo.


Step #1: Clothespin


Cut the clothespin using whatever method you like. A simple hacksaw works. I took a bag of clothespins to my old shop teacher and spent a while cutting them all on a table saw.


Posted Image




Step #2: Drill the clothespin


Put a 9/64” hole through the entire clothespin somewhere around here:

Posted Image


The exact placement doesn’t matter much, but centered width-wise is the goal, and in the front half would be good.



Step #3: Fit, test, trim, repeat


Stick your nail in the hole and see how hard it is to open and close the clothespin. If you can open it around half way without too much trouble, it’s probably good enough. However, if the nail is too tight in the hole, you may want to widen it just a little until the nail is semi-loose.

I then usually place the clothespin and nail into the hole we drilled in the body of the blaster to see how far it sticks into the pipe.

Posted Image Posted Image


When flush against the pipe, the nail should stick straight into the pipe (not what you see above). The nail should also stick into the pipe only about 3/8”, just enough to catch into the gap between the two fender washers on the plunger. The trim and repeat part of the process comes from finding the right length of nail. The only ‘right’ way of doing it is trial and error. 3/8” may be too much, or too little. I’ve found it’s typically around 3/8”. Using a grinding wheel, sandpaper, or files, trim down the nail so it’s shorter and round on the top. The nail needs to travel up the ramp into the catch and a round, smooth, slightly angled nail has a much easier time doing this than a pointy one. Here’s a post by TantumBull borrowed from the Community Snap Thread (iModify).


Take both the 1” long nylon spacers. The nylon spacer’s inner diameter (ID) will be too small for ¼-20 screws, so drill them wider with a 15/64” drill bit. Please use power tools responsibly if you have not been already. Use a clamp or pliers to hold the work piece as you drill. Trying to hold it in your hand would only work for select few individuals – Chuck Norris, for example.

Posted Image




Take the CPVC and push in the two 1” long nylon spacers, one in either end. These spacers will be the anchor points for the two ends of the rod.

Posted Image




Measure ¾” from either end of the CPVC…

Posted Image



…and drill two more 15/64” holes approximately halfway through the plunger rod. Then add some set screws.

Posted Image Posted Image


I use set screws here because I’ve found that just friction fitting the components together does not hold up if accidentally dry-fired. You could just glue the spacers into the CPVC with PVC cement and it would work just as well, but I like not using glue so I can disassemble as much as possible for whatever reason I may want to. Not using glue also means you don’t have to worry about having to wait for it to dry. Placing the screws far enough down in the spacers is so that the machine screws can screw in all the way without hitting the set screw.



After the spacers are anchored properly, you may want to sand the CPVC where there may be some rough spots form the drilling and screwing. The rod should be smooth and even to ensure low friction, but if you choose not to, the slight increase in friction shouldn’t make a large difference. I’m just a little obsessive-compulsive about making things as perfect as possible.

Posted Image Posted Image




Step #2: Plunger head

I like to work on the plunger head first, so set the CPVC assembly aside. The plunger head is what creates the seal in the PVC and acts as the catch plate.


We’ll first create the plunger head, or PH, by taking the ½” CPVC end cap and drilling a 15/64” hole as centered as we can. One way to get the hole centered is to put a section of ½” CPVC on the end cap and a sharpie should fit near centered in it. I’m not sure where I saw this first, but if I find out where, I’ll add it.

Posted Image Posted Image


The self-centering sharpie should make a dot near perfectly in the middle of the cap.

Posted Image



Then simply drill the 15/64” hole.

Posted Image

This cap will act as the spring stop for the front of the plunger rod and will also serve as a base to build the epoxy putty ramp on. I’ll explain more about what all this means after we have assembled more onto the plunger rod.



Push the CPVC end cap onto the end of the CPVC rod. It does not matter which end it’s on, but this end will now be the front of the plunger. The hole in the end cap should line up with the hole in the nylon spacer.

Posted Image



Assemble the plunger head onto the 1/4-20 1-1/4” long machine screw by putting the ¾” washer, 1-1/4” rubber washer, 1-1/2” rubber washer, 1-1/4” fender washer, nylon spacer, and finally another 1-1/4” fender washer on in that order.

Posted Image Posted Image


Before moving on, a note about the ¾” washer. I did not have one with the correct ID, but for some reason, I really felt like using a ¾” washer. It seemed to be the size that worked best. Maybe your experience is different, but I dunno. Anyway, I had to drill a larger ID in my washer.

I just held the washer with a pair of pliers and drilled a larger, ¼”, ID.

Posted Image Posted Image


It’s easiest if you drill one side, and then the other until you make it all the way through. Nothing too fancy or difficult, but drilling washers can be a useful skill I think.


Screw this entire assembly onto the front of the plunger rod. When tightened properly, the washers should make a slight ‘cup’ shape.

Posted Image Posted Image


This cup shape creates an effective air seal moving forward, but also has low friction and vents air moving backward which prevents darts from being accidentally sucked from the barrel into the pressure-chamber/air-chamber/body of the blaster (Lemma).

Spoiler

The rubber washer seal can also be replaced by other sealing methods such as u-cup seals (skirt seals), o-ring seals, or grommet seals, but rubber washers are probably the easiest, cheapest, and most commonly used.




Step #2.1: Plunger head catch ramp


The catch ramp.

The roofing nail will slide up this ramp and into the slot between the two fender washers at the front of the plunger. The nail will sit against the fender washer until moved downward from a pull of the trigger, release the spring, and the blaster will fire.


To make the catch ramp, remove a section of epoxy putty from the stick and knead it until it becomes uniform in color; it should also become warmer as the chemical reaction occurs.

Posted Image



Apply the putty to the ½” CPVC end cap and form a ramp shape along the end cap, as shown. This shouldn’t be too difficult, especially anyone with experience with Play-Doh or clay. I like the ramp to start from the base of the CPVC end cap and end at the top of the first fender washer.

Posted Image Posted Image


Just so there’s no further confusion about what happens here, this is an informative post by Carbon about how SNAP triggers work (Carbon):

There always seems to be a bit of confusion about exactly how SNAP triggers work. Fair enough, half of the mechanism is hidden inside the plunger tube, and I can't see anyone shelling out for a transparent SNAP anytime soon. There was a request for diagrams of a SNAP trigger over at the HQ, so I made these up.

Here's the plunger at rest:
Posted Image

Plunger at mid-draw:
Posted Image

Primed and ready to fire:
Posted Image




Step #3: Spring Stop

After the plunger head is mounted properly and curing, take a look at the ¾” PVC end cap. This is the spring stop. The spring will rest against this and will compress against this when primed. A 5/8” hole needs drilled in this and the sides need sanded down so that it fits without resistance in the main body. The plunger rod will slide through this, and needs to do so without friction.


Take the end cap and drill a centered 5/8” hole. I haven’t found a real great way for this, but the end cap is bowled slightly and, if done gently, the bit may rest at the bottom of the fitting and be centered. Test fit the end cap with the CPVC. If there’s a lot of resistance when sliding through, sand, file, or drill the ID a little more. Don’t go overboard on the sanding. If the ID is sanded too wide, the spring may get caught between the CPVC and end cap and jam. Once that is done, sand the fitting so it fits inside the 1-1/4” PVC. It should fit with little resistance.

Here is a picture of what the finished fitting should end up looking somewhat like:

Posted Image Posted Image




Step #4: Plunger Assembly


The plunger rod is almost done. Just slide on the [k26] spring, the finished ¾” PVC end cap, and screw on the last 1-1/4” OD fender washer with a ¼-20 3/4” machine screw to top it all off. The spring should rest against the ¾” end cap and ½” CPVC end cap on either end.

Posted Image


A quick autopsy of the plunger rod workings: the rubber washers, again, create the seal. The metal washers and nylon spacers at the front act as the ‘retaining’ feature for the nail when the blaster is primed. The nail travels up the ramp and into the gap of the two washers. The PVC end cap acts as the stop for the spring which it compresses against. The metal washer at the very end of the plunger rod is the ‘priming disk’. The priming bolts connected to the priming slide or pump slide push against this disk to prime the blaster. This entire thing is held together by the two set screws, nylon spacers, and ¼-20 machine screws. NerfoMania originally used a polycarbonate disk as the priming disk, but a fender washer is easier and requires less work because there is no need to create a circle cut out of polycarbonate (iModify).




Trigger

This is the standard SNAP trigger mechanism, the clothespin and roofing nail combo.


Step #1: Clothespin


Cut the clothespin using whatever method you like. A simple hacksaw works. I took a bag of clothespins to my old shop teacher and spent a while cutting them all on a table saw.


Posted Image




Step #2: Drill the clothespin


Put a 9/64” hole through the entire clothespin somewhere around here:

Posted Image


The exact placement doesn’t matter much, but centered width-wise is the goal, and in the front half would be good.



Step #3: Fit, test, trim, repeat


Stick your nail in the hole and see how hard it is to open and close the clothespin. If you can open it around half way without too much trouble, it’s probably good enough. However, if the nail is too tight in the hole, you may want to widen it just a little until the nail is semi-loose.

I then usually place the clothespin and nail into the hole we drilled in the body of the blaster to see how far it sticks into the pipe.

Posted Image Posted Image


When flush against the pipe, the nail should stick straight into the pipe (not what you see above). The nail should also stick into the pipe only about 3/8”, just enough to catch into the gap between the two fender washers on the plunger. The trim and repeat part of the process comes from finding the right length of nail. The only ‘right’ way of doing it is trial and error. 3/8” may be too much, or too little. I’ve found it’s typically around 3/8”. Using a grinding wheel, sandpaper, or files, trim down the nail so it’s shorter and round on the top. The nail needs to travel up the ramp into the catch and a round, smooth, slightly angled nail has a much easier time doing this than a pointy one. Here’s a post by TantumBull borrowed from the [url="http://nerfhaven.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=19997&st=0&p=281969&#entry281969"]Community Snap Thread that illustrates the point-no pun intended (TantumBull):


The nature of having a metal catch and any plastic on the plunger head means that the plastic will be subject wear. A good way to negate this as much as possible is to use a metal catch face (superlative or preeminent plunger head) in combination with a rounded roofing nail.

Below is a picture of my previous roofing nail.
Posted Image
As you can imagine, it completely diddled my endcap. It also didn't help that the sharpest edge would be resting on the [formerly] plastic catchface.

Here's a new roofing nail that I fixed up this morning. Notice the rounded tip that I attained through the use of a carbon sanding bit on my dremel and also just a conventional metal file.
Posted Image





Step #4: Mounting


I like mechanically fastening stuff. A lot of people glue or epoxy their triggers though, so those are options available as well. To attach the trigger, I first counter sink a small hole for the head of a #6 sized screw just enough so that the head doesn’t interfere with the fulcrum of the clothespin (the spring). I use the verb ‘countersink’ to describe the process of drilling partially into the clothespin just in front of the spring with a 5/16” drill bit. The picture should clear up any confusion about this explanation.

Posted Image



Make sure the trigger is flush with the center line drawn on the bottom of the blaster, and drill a 7/64” hole for the #6-32 screw.

Posted Image


Then add the screw.

Posted Image




Step #5: The actual trigger part

With the clothespin reassembled onto the body, take the angle bracket, or corner brace, and place it against the clothespin. Mark where the holes in the bracket line up on the clothespin.

Posted Image



Drill two more 7/64” holes where the marks on the clothespin are and attach the #6-32 screws, finishing washers, and bracket to the clothespin.

Posted Image
This picture was borrowed from later in the write-up and so the set screws would not be added yet.


Pulling on the trigger opens the clothespin, lowers the nail, and fires the blaster. Assembling the trigger this way isn’t the best and could definitely use some revamping. However, what was done is necessary. Gluing things together makes it impossible to replace, and screws with larger heads to hold on the bracket had too long of lengths to be used. So, instead, finishing washers and smaller screws were used.

Edited by Naturalman7, 24 January 2014 - 09:08 AM.

  • 0

#3 Naturalman7

Naturalman7

    Member

  • Contributors
  • 158 posts
  • Location:Boise, Idaho
  • State:Idaho
  • Country:United States

Posted 23 January 2014 - 08:44 PM

The Assembly of the Internals

In this step, what has been made so far will be attached to the rest of the blaster.


Step #1: Lubrication


After the trigger is mounted and the nail ground down a little, it’s time to put the internals into the blaster. Lubricate the rubber washers on the PH and the inside of the front of the body with appropriate grease.

This stuff works well and is what was used for this build:

Posted Image


There’s a lot of discussion about lubricants: what works well, what doesn’t, what should never be used, and what might be okay. All of this boils down to look for something silicone based and in the plumbing section, and it should be okay. Some other sources to make choosing a grease easier are this post and thread by CaptainSlug (a respectable source) is a very good post (CaptainSlug), this discussion which several reliable contributors have posted in (nerfer34), this thread (Yazzeh), some information in this thread is good (Papershruiken), this thread has some useful information (nerfboi), or a simple Google search can find answers. All of these threads are discussions about what lubricants work well, or don’t. Just stay away from questionable lubes and anything that doesn’t explicitly say ‘rubber’ or ‘plastic safe’ on it. If you’re thinking about WD-40, don’t. I’ve heard many new Nerfers instantly go for WD-40 when lubricants are mentioned -either WD-40 or K-Y jelly.

WD-40 IS NOT A LUBRICANT, it's an aggressive degreaser and mild acid with traces of lubricant. It's really only meant for loosening joints that have dried grease and rust prior to cleaning them and then applying a real lubricant. It shouldn't be used with plastics or any kind of rubber.

Petroleum based lubricants too are not to be used with Plastics or any kind of rubber. It will degrade rubber. It will also penetrate and alter the material properties of a wide range of plastics that are not specifically chemical resistant.

Silicone spray lubricant is really the only thing you should be using with plastics.

And that's really all there is to it.

(Yazzeh)





Step #2: The Alignment


Take the plunger rod and, back end first (the end with the single washer on it), slide it into the front of the blaster. This is where a long skinny thing comes in handy. Push the assembly down into the blaster. Pull the clothespin open for this step so that the nail doesn’t get in the way. The metal washer on the end should appear in the priming slots that were cut earlier. For the next step, hold the endcap and the fender washer apart with a ¼-20 screw. This distance is needed to make sure the spring rest is in front of the priming slot, as pictured. You may not have to do this. When this guide was written, 11.25” of CPVC was used and ended up being a little too short because the compression that the end cap would create was overestimated.


Posted Image


This position of the screw is where the screw will rest when the slide is forward. The gap is needed so that when the holes are drilled and two set screws are put in to hold the spring stop, the placement of them will be in the right spot; with the end cap wholly in front of the slots




Step #3: Spring stop, revisited


With the entire assembly held in place, drill a 15/64” hole in one side of the blaster on the line that should be right next to the priming slot.

Posted Image


Drill this hole through both the body and spring stop. Then, add a set screw. Repeat this for the other side. Two set screws were used because any more seems redundant and any less may not hold well enough, or allow for too much torqueing and cause issues primarily in regards to friction.

Posted Image


Before moving onto the next step, this is a great time to double check that the nail is ground down enough. Using the long skinny thing, push the plunger down from the front. The catching mechanism should engage and the trigger should visually move down, then back up, and the blaster should prime (Carbon). If the transition to prime the blaster is too rough, sand/grind the nail down a little more and test again. The nail is likely the hardest part to get the hang of for most SNAP blasters, but more practice and familiarity will make the process easier and less lengthy.




Step #4: Front bushing

After the body and the rest of the blaster up to this point is satisfactory, the next step is to create the front bushing that will connect to your barrel/hopper assembly (more on loading mechanisms in the barrel section at the end). Getting this front part sealed air-tight is essential to a well-performing blaster. As Zorns Lemma said (Lemma):

...
Finding a good barrel setup and sealing the front bushing is going to increase ranges much more than spring compression.




Step #4.1: Packing tape


Take the 1”-1/2” bushing…

Posted Image


…and wrap it in packing tape until it fits snugly in the front of the blaster. Wrapping a pipe fitting in packing tape is probably the weirdest sounding step one would ever hear. A more experienced Nerfer, Stark, made the remark that packing tape is better than electrical tape for this part (Stark). Some people use electrical tape, but packing tape is thinner, cheaper, wider, and clear. The only pro to electrical tape is that maybe it’s a little bit easier to get a good seal with.


...I used packing tape instead of e-tape because e-tape is really narrow, which means there's a good chance that the coupler would be crooked, and packing tape has an extremely consistent thickness of 0.003 inches.


Posted Image


Trim the excess tape. A note about this step, the easiest way is with a box cutter knife of some type. Putting the bushing into the blaster is also a lot easier if the edge that goes into the blaster is chamfered or beveled (rounded). Chamfering the edge helps the bushing go into the front of the blaster and is also easiest done with box cutter. Pictured are scissors, but a box cutter works much better.

Posted Image




Step #4.2: Plumber’s goop


Apply a small amount of plumber’s goop around the side of the bushing…

Posted Image


…and slide it into the front of the blaster. It should sit flush with the edge and be level. Any excess plumber’s goop applied should come to the top of the bushing. Mold it around the front seam of the bushing to ensure that the front stays sealed tight.

Posted Image




Step #4.3: Attachment

Throughout this next step, make sure the bushing stays flush and level. It shouldn’t be very difficult if enough packing tape was used, as Stark said.


Drill two 15/64” holes on either side of the marks made on this section previously. It’s ideal if the bit is stopped just before breaking through on the inside of the bushing, but that’s just another obsessive-compulsive thing that only provides a slight benefit. After the holes are made, fill them a little with goop (it helps if the goop came with a little nozzle) and screw in two ¼-20 set screws. Again, the excess should rise to the top, or it may squeeze into the inside. Either way, clear off the excess and put some of that over the tops of the set screws to make sure they’re sealed.





Priming slide/pump

This piece will be the pump part of ‘pump-action’. It can be called a slide, pump, priming grip, etc.


Step #1: Gluing


Whether it’s a slide, pump, or whatever, take the 16” of thinwall 1-1/2” PVC and use PVC cement to glue the 1-1/2” PVC coupler to either end. This 1-1/2” PVC should be of the lower PSI rating variety. The PSI of the pipe used in this guide was 160 PSI. It should slide over 1-1/4” PVC freely.

Posted Image


Gluing the coupler on the end gives the screws that will thread into the slide more material to grip onto. Otherwise, the thinwall PVC wouldn’t be able to withstand the force put on it and would likely crack and break.




Step #2: Measuring more (I'm planning on re-doing this section because it's just...bad)


Set the slide against the body of the blaster and set the middle of the coupler against the furthest end of the priming slot. In this position, mark where the clothespin trigger begins, and ends on the priming slide. The mark closest to the front of the blaster will be where the narrower end of the slot will be cut and the other will be where the wider part of the slide will be cut to. The wider section allows the slide to fit over the handle of the blaster and the narrow section will fit around the clothespin trigger because the slide must be pulled back further than where the trigger is. The wording may be confusing, so here’s a bunch of pictures to help:


Do not follow the cut out section in these pictures. It was not measured twice before cutting.

Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image


Using the engineer’s ruler again, mark about .5” more than half away around. You want .5” more than half left over to leave enough material on all sides of the machine screws that will be added to this piece. The gap will be around ¼”. The cross-section of the slide should be a crescent shape.


Posted Image Posted Image

You’ll also need to cut off 2” of half-pipe off of the front. Make sure the half-pipe you cut off is on the top half, opposite the markings for bottom of the trigger. It’s necessary to cut off this section so that a hopper-type clip and wye (more on hoppers and wyes in the barrel section) can sit flush with the front of the blaster and not have to sit too far forward.

Posted Image


So you don’t have this:

Posted Image




Step #3: Cutting

If you did this in the order I did, you’ll have to wait for the slide to dry before moving on. If you read ahead and planned better than I did, the slide should be dry.


Take the slide and cut just before the middle of the coupler.

Posted Image



Cut the slide where marked.


I did not measure this slide properly before cutting; the narrower cut section should not be so long, and should actually be centered on the pump properly.

Posted Image


If done properly, the bottom of the slide should line up with the bottom of the blaster.

Posted Image


The wider part:

Posted Image


The front:

Posted Image





Step #4: Priming Handle

The priming slide should be nearly complete. All that’s missing is a nice handle to hold onto when priming because there’s not quite enough area of thinwall left to prime with otherwise.



Step #4.1: Cutting


Take the Maverick slide and cut along the front angled section:


Before:

Posted Image


After:

Posted Image


Another tidbit of information: also cut or sand down the two aesthetic nubs on the back of the slide (now the front of the priming grip). These two nubs stick out and can make the handle less comfortable when priming. This small detail is optional, of course, but makes the handle more comfortable overall.

Posted Image




Another bit of cutting needed on the Maverick slide is on the bottom. We want the slide to sit evenly on the new pump slide, so cut and sand down the bottom so it sits nicely on the PVC.


Before:

Posted Image


After:

Posted Image





Step #5: Attaching the Maverick slide as the new handle


The Maverick slide should sit centered over the slot cut for the trigger and be flush with the front of the pump slide. What I like to do when attaching the handle is to apply a small amount of hot glue on the edges of the Maverick slide and make sure it is lined up correctly to have the hot glue hold the slide in place as I add a more permanent method of attachment.

Posted Image



I usually add epoxy putty on the edges and then fill the inside with a plethora of hot glue. On this blaster, I only used hot glue to hold it because I was out of epoxy and wanted to test and see if just hot glue could be strong enough to hold it.

Posted Image Posted Image



This assembly should be able to slide onto the body and, when fully pulled back, fit around the clothespin and handle.

Posted Image Posted Image




Step #6: Priming bolts

The last critical thing to do on the priming slide is to attach the priming bolts. These are the bolts that will push on the priming disk on the back of the plunger rod.


With the priming slide positioned on the body, drill two 7/32” holes on either side of the priming slide. The drill bit should be perpendicular to the slide and body and be able to enter one side of the slide and out the other.

Posted Image



Screw in the two ¼-20 x ¾” machine screws. They should sit directly across from each other.

Posted Image



To attach this assembly to the rest of the blaster, you’ll have to use the long skinny thing again, prime the blaster, and then screw in the machine screws. This is because the plunger rod may be too far forward to have the clearance to accept the machine screws, as pictured:

Posted Image Posted Image

Edited by Naturalman7, 24 January 2014 - 09:00 AM.

  • 0

#4 Naturalman7

Naturalman7

    Member

  • Contributors
  • 158 posts
  • Location:Boise, Idaho
  • State:Idaho
  • Country:United States

Posted 23 January 2014 - 09:09 PM

Handle

I usually do this piece last. There’s no great reason why, but it may be because it’s the least functional part of the blaster and is the least critical. Before moving on, make sure that, when the slide is pulled all the way back, the catching mechanism engages. If not, then the slide is not moving back far enough and there must be a serious error in the measuring.


Step #1: Cut

Take the Maverick handle and cut the handle as shown. Nothin’ to it. I prefer using a hacksaw to cut the handle and then tidy it up a little bit, if necessary, with a sanding wheel. Cut flush with where the Maverick slide was previously and around the middle of the bottom of the trigger guard.


Before:

Posted Image


After:

Posted Image



Then simply hollow the handle out a little bit as was done previously on the Maverick slide. By removing the extra plastic in the middle:

Posted Image




Step #2: Glue


Take the handle, apply a little bit of glue, align it with the bottom of the blaster, and glue it just behind the trigger.

Posted Image


On this blaster, I placed the handle a little bit before the trigger just because I didn’t want the clothespin to hit against the handle when the trigger was pulled. Putting it back this far doesn’t provide any significant benefit, but on the blaster I made previous to this one I had put the handle too far forward and had problems with the trigger not opening far enough.

Posted Image



After the alignment of the handle is where desired, add epoxy putty to the edges to hold it on and then, for good measure, fill the inside of the handle with about two or so sticks of hot glue.

Posted ImagePosted Image



Some may worry about the attachment of the handle. An answer to those worries can be found here (TantumBull)

Good write-up, but a few things worry me about your attachment methods of the handles. The priming grip probably won't pose too much of an issue as it has a lot of surface area bonded to the pump and is shorter so there's less stress on the joint (less leverage). The handle worries me a bit more. I would highly recommend utilizing some mechanical forms of attachment like screws or pins.

Otherwise looks like a nice blaster.

I have literally tried to rip the handle off and have been unsuccessful. However you are correct. On the blasters I put Nf handles on I use screws. Thanks for the constructive criticism.





Stock

The stock can be added at any time, but I like to save it at the end and it isn’t a lengthy step.


Step #1: Throw it together


Take the 1-1/4” PVC tee, end cap, and the section of 1-1/4” PVC and assemble them together.

Posted Image


Slide this piece on the end of the blaster and if, when the slide is pulled all the way back, there is still space between the slide and stock, like mine because I cut the main body a little too long, trim off the excess, then drill a 15/64” hole and add one last set screw to the back.

Posted Image


I like to make (and I’m sure others can attest to this) my stock this way for the best comfort. The tee is used for added height and the end cap is for increased comfort. Depending on how you like your blaster to sit in your shoulder, this may, or may not, be necessary. If you wanted to, you could take it even further and do what Nerfomania did in his PumpSnap writeup and add an acrylic cap to the top after trimming the tee down (Nerfomania). I think it’s a superfluous step and fail to see what benefit it gives, but to each his own and I do believe that everyone has their own comfort preferences. I’ve included the short section of his write-up here in case one was interested.

Spoiler




Last Minute Touches


Round out any edges that may be pointy and add some nice craft foam to your handle.

Posted Image Posted Image




The final product


Posted Image



 

Maintenance

Typical maintenance is required. Re-lubricate infrequently and clear the inside of any possible debris and grime.


To remove the internals of the blaster, the plunger rod will have to be taken out from the back of the blaster. Simply take off the stock, the priming slide, and unscrew the spring rest. Push the plunger from the front and out the back.

When putting it back in, the easiest way is to use the help of a screwdriver or something similar to poke the washers through the points where it may snag: at the start, at the end of the priming slot, and where the holes for the setscrews are. Don’t forget to pull the trigger when taking the plunger rod in and out.

Spoiler


 

Improvements

There isn’t really anything to make this design better, but what kind of arrogant person would say their blaster is already perfect.

From the design itself, there is little to improve. However, during the process of construction, every step should be made precisely, even more-so than this guide has covered. The placement and cutting of the handle, the measuring of the pump slide, the drilling of the plunger rod, and the assembly of the trigger are all points where the most trouble could be found. If, such as in the writing of this write-up, a step is rushed or not thought out in advance, the position of all these components may be off and require continued adjustment until the final product is satisfactory.

 

Barrels and loading mechanisms

This section is not as fully explained as this write-up because each mechanism is independent of this build and can be used on nearly any homemade and, as such, each are deserving of their own, separate, mini-writeups.


In the world of Nerf (at least at this current time), there are a few most common ways of firing darts from a blaster. The most common is what is called a hopper. Read more here (Ryan201821). It’s essentially a wye PVC fitting that uses gravity to load a dart into the barrel. A variant of this is the ‘Chopper’ (Muttonchops).

Another is the RCSB clip. Which a basic understanding can be read here (ShortShit). This is the predecessor to the hopper clip and works essentially the same, but the tube for holding darts is parallel with the barrel.

 

Testing

This blaster has been around for a while now and the performance of its design is already proven so this section would be merely for posterity’s sake. Whether or not this section is required is debatable and may, or may not, be worked on further. At the moment, it is a work in progress.

 

Closing

Hopefully, this guide has been as instructive and informative as intended. If there are any further questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to let those be known so that appropriate changes can be made in the format, order, or wording of the write-up. This has been intended to be a resource for new homemade builders who want a nudge in the right direction as I would have wanted when I first looked. If you think anything should be added, say so.

 


Glossary


Chamfer-cut away (a right-angled edge or corner) to make a sloping edge.

Countersink-enlarge and bevel the rim of (a drilled hole) so that a screw, nail, or bolt can be inserted flush with the surface.

CPVC-Chlorinated polyvinyl chloride. The tan pipe. Smaller than PVC pipe and more expensive. The small size and relative inexpensiveness makes it a common type used in blasters.

Dry-fire-to fire a blaster with a dart loaded in the barrel. This causes unnecessary stress on the blaster parts because there is no stoppage of air in the pressure chamber that would normally create an air cushion to lessen the impact of the moving parts.

Epoxy putty-can typically be found in the home repair or adhesive section of stores. It is room-temperature-hardening substance used as a space-filling adhesive. It is stored until used as two components of clay-like consistency. Kneading the two components into each other creates an exothermic chemical reaction that activates the substance for use by catalyzing an epoxide polymerisation reaction. Unlike many other types of glues, an epoxy adhesive can fill gaps and even be molded into a structural part. Some makers claim in advertising that one can tap and drill their cured product, and that it quickly cures “hard as steel” (as measured by Shore rating), though it is much weaker than steel in tensile strength and shear strength (Wikipedia).

Homemade-refers to a Nerf gun built from scratch using no structure from an existing, official Nerf or similar branded product

Long skinny thing-a useful tool used for poking and pushing in deep, narrow holes.

Maverick-a single-fire, revolver shape, N-Strike Nerf gun.

McMaster-Carr Supply Company-a private, family-owned supplier to industrial and commercial facilities worldwide, specializing in next day delivery of Maintenance, Repair and Operations materials and supplies.

Plumber’s Goop-a waterproof adhesive and sealant that is flexible and will not break or crack.

Plunger head-the front part of the plunger that is home to the sealing device and catch mechanism.

Plunger-imagine a bicycle pump. The plunger is the piece with the seal that typically moves up and down. In a blaster, it’s that same piece. It usually has a seal, a catch, and a method of pulling or pushing it back to prime the blaster.

Pre-compression-the amount of compression that a spring undergoes while in its longest, relaxed, position.

Prime-to make compress the spring and engage a catch mechanism so the blaster is ready to fire.

Priming slide/pump-the moving part of the priming mechanism that compresses the spring

Pump-action-denoting a repeating gun in which the weapon is cocked or primed by a slide action in line with the barrel.

PVC-Polyvinyl chloride. The white pipe. The most common, cheapest material that is used as the base for nearly all basic homemades.

Set screw-socket set screws are, fundamentally, a headless screw (also called blind) and are instead driven with an internal-wrenching drive, such as a heck socket (Allen).

SNAP-a simple, basic, easy type of blaster. SNAP’s have cheap price, easy to make, and reliability in common.

Spade bit-used for rough boring in wood. They are flat, with a centered point and two cutters.

Spring stop-the piece that prevents, or stops, the spring from moving past that point. It acts as one of the compressing forces on the spring in conjunction with the plunger head as the other.

Wye-(in plumbing) a short pipe with a branch joining it at an acute angle.


 


Sources

Beaver, Daniel. “Quixote.” 12 Nov 2011. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...owtopic=21824>.

CaptainSlug, . “Plastic Safe Lubricants.” 28 Apr 2009. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...owtopic=16267>.

Carbon, . “The Snap 7.5 Pump Crossbow.” 01 Sep 2010. N.p., Online Posting to Nerfhaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...owtopic=20162>.

Carbon, . “Snap Trigger Diagrams.” 01 Jul 2010. N.p., Online Posting to Nerfhaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...owtopic=19798>.

Lemma, Zorns. “+bow Mod.” 16 Dec 2009. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...&#entry259215>.

Muttonchops, . “Hybrid Hopper, Combines Hopper With Brisc.” 03 Aug 2010. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...owtopic=19999>.

nerfboi, . “Silicone Spray.” 23 Oct 2008. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...owtopic=13669>.

nerfer34, . “Gun Lubricants-lubes.” 13 Feb 2006. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...howtopic=5869>.

Nerfomania, . “PumpSnap writeup..” 05 Jun 2011. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...st=0&p=299392>.

Nerfomania, . “Viewing Profile: Nerfomania.” 11 Feb 2010. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 22 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...howuser=38078>.

Ozymandias, . “PumpSnap writeup..” 06 Jun 2011. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...&#entry299430>.

Papershruiken, . “Plunger Seals and Lube.” 28 Apr 2012. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...owtopic=22503>.

Phoenix66, . “Perfect PVC quarter marking jig..” 13 Aug 2012. N.p., Online Posting to NerfRevolution. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://www.nerfrevol...hp?f=9&t=5285>.

Ryan201821, . “Diy: Hopper Clips.” 24 May 2014. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...owtopic=19569>.

ShortShit, . “R.S.C.B. Barrel Assembly Mod.” ShortShit, Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...mods/ss_rscb/>.

Stark, . “Pumpsnap.” 04 Aug 2010. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...&#entry282170>.

Sun, Derrikk. “PumpSNAP 3.0 cost sheet.” Google Docs. N.p., 20 01 2014. Web. 21 Jan 2014. <https://docs.google....ive_web#gid=0>.

Sun, Derrikk. Pump-action SNAP 3.0 Diagram. 2014. Graphic. PhotobucketWeb. 21 Jan 2014.

TantumBull, . “Community Snap Thread.” 03 Aug 2010. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...&#entry281969>.

TantumBull, . 05 Jun 2011. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...post&p=299392>.

TheNerfOmania, , dir. Quick PumpSnap 3.0 Overview (and differences from a 2.0). 2012. Web. 21 Jan 2014. <

Yazzeh, . “Plunger Lubricants....” 17 May 2007. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...howtopic=8572>.

zx532, . “Full Compression of a [k26].” 21 Sep 2014. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...owtopic=23159>.

iModify, . “Alternative Pumpsnap 3.0 Disk Method.” 12 May 2013. N.p., Online Posting to NerfHaven. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. <http://nerfhaven.com...owtopic=23922>.





You may now post, if desired. I've looked through numerous times, but if there's anything wrong, please say so. I'm planning on re-doing the pump slide section, I just think it's written horribly and the pictures don't help much.



I'll try to answer questions better than in my previous write-up


Edited by Naturalman7, 24 January 2014 - 09:14 AM.

  • 0

#5 Nerfgirl36

Nerfgirl36

    Member

  • Members
  • 202 posts
  • State:Illinois
  • Country:United States

Posted 23 January 2014 - 09:50 PM

Very nice writeup! I was planning on making my first pumpsnap soon and wanted a 3.0 writeup. I love how you went so in depth and made a glossary. It really helps new nerfers. Great job. I did get lost once or twice but found my way back after rereading.
  • 0
- Nerfgirl36
Yeah I'm a girl....get used to it.

#6 Zorns Lemma

Zorns Lemma

    Sir Scrt

  • Moderators
  • 1,277 posts
  • Location:Dulles International Airport
  • State:Virginia
  • Country:United States

Posted 23 January 2014 - 09:57 PM

Post #2 in this thread, regarding the plunger rod construction, seems to have sections repeated.

Otherwise, fantastic job.
  • 0
"In short, the same knowledge that underlies the ability to produce correct judgement is also the knowledge that underlies the ability to recognize correct judgement. To lack the former is to be deficient in the latter."
Kruger and Dunning (1999)

#7 Nerfomania

Nerfomania

    Member

  • Members
  • 207 posts
  • Location:Canton
  • State:Georgia
  • Country:United States

Posted 23 January 2014 - 11:12 PM

Looks great! Very thorough.
  • 0
20:45 Talio I'll have the talk with you
20:45 Talio penis in vagina
20:45 Talio fin

#8 iModify

iModify

    Member

  • Members
  • 76 posts

Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:43 AM

Nice man, this would've helped me so much when I was making my first pumpsnap. Also thanks for giving credit and improving my design!
  • 0
Air guns go bang bang

-iModify

#9 Naturalman7

Naturalman7

    Member

  • Contributors
  • 158 posts
  • Location:Boise, Idaho
  • State:Idaho
  • Country:United States

Posted 24 January 2014 - 09:13 AM

Post #2 in this thread, regarding the plunger rod construction, seems to have sections repeated.

Otherwise, fantastic job.


Yea, about that. I noticed that as well, but I assumed it was a problem with my side of things because, after clicking the edit button and looking for the section, I could not find it. For example, when 'ctrl-F'ing, the word "borrow" only shows up twice in the post, which it should. I didn't find the third entry anywhere. The post 'code' looks just fine, but for some reason it appears as repeated. I'm so confused.
  • 0

#10 Meaker VI

Meaker VI

    Member

  • Moderators
  • 1,181 posts
  • State:Washington
  • Country:United States
  • u/MeakerVI on Reddit

Posted 24 January 2014 - 11:25 AM

I'm offended by you thinking someone would be offended by this. Remove that sub-title!

Very professionally done, it is long, but I find it's better to be thorough than not.

RE: Slot cutting: Without a dremel, you can cut really clean slots with a 12-24" piece of mason's twine. You can also cut the PVC crosswise with it, but it won't help in cutting anything that isn't PVC so having a saw for that is still necessary and probably faster. Drill 4 small holes, one on each of the corners of your slot, thread one end through one of the holes, and pull back and fourth along your line. It'll take time, but is less messy (still lots of PVC shredding, but just in one direction instead of all over the place) and easier to control (since you're going slow by default).
  • 0

#11 Naturalman7

Naturalman7

    Member

  • Contributors
  • 158 posts
  • Location:Boise, Idaho
  • State:Idaho
  • Country:United States

Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:28 PM

Thanks for the feedback, I appreciate it.

I'm offended by you thinking someone would be offended by this. Remove that sub-title!

Very professionally done, it is long, but I find it's better to be thorough than not.

RE: Slot cutting: Without a dremel, you can cut really clean slots with a 12-24" piece of mason's twine. You can also cut the PVC crosswise with it, but it won't help in cutting anything that isn't PVC so having a saw for that is still necessary and probably faster. Drill 4 small holes, one on each of the corners of your slot, thread one end through one of the holes, and pull back and fourth along your line. It'll take time, but is less messy (still lots of PVC shredding, but just in one direction instead of all over the place) and easier to control (since you're going slow by default).


I came across this method before and I considered adding it, but I'm not sure how it works. Isn't mason twine just the rope used to level posts and bricks? I'm not sure if it's the same thing you're talking about, but I don't see how it can cut PVC.
  • 0

#12 Meaker VI

Meaker VI

    Member

  • Moderators
  • 1,181 posts
  • State:Washington
  • Country:United States
  • u/MeakerVI on Reddit

Posted 24 January 2014 - 07:26 PM

I came across this method before and I considered adding it, but I'm not sure how it works. Isn't mason twine just the rope used to level posts and bricks?


It is, and it's commonly available everywhere in neon spools for a few bucks/100 or so feet. Same stuff sometimes used here to make bowstrings.

I'm not sure if it's the same thing you're talking about, but I don't see how it can cut PVC.


It is, and it can. I believe it has to do with the ridges formed in the twine's twist abrading the PVC. Apparently you can use steel cable too, but I've only used mason's twine. Works incredibly well, I recommend just trying it if you've got the stuff lying around.
  • 0

#13 andrewp413

andrewp413

    Member

  • Members
  • 18 posts
  • State:New Jersey
  • Country:United States

Posted 25 January 2014 - 10:23 AM

Very thorough write up. I am going to keep looking back to this when I make my ring catch pumpsnap . One typo that I found was that you said that "dry firing is with the dart in the barrel". Sorry for the nitpicking, I just thought that new nerfers might get confused. Very nice write up style, I think I might have to use this as a template. :)
  • 0

#14 quertyman

quertyman

    Member

  • Members
  • 188 posts
  • Location:85253
  • State:Arizona
  • Country:United States

Posted 31 January 2014 - 12:25 AM

This is by far the best write up I have seen, ever. Props to that. Extremely thorough and thought out. What really blew me away was all the quotes you made of the original people. If I were an english teacher I would give you extra credit. Construction a little on the shoddy side (I have had 2 mav handles break off using your method) but gets the point across well none the less. You better be submitting this to the homemades contest. Good thing this isn't in the plusbow category :lol: . Also I agree with above post change that subtitle! Nobody is offended.

Edited by quertyman, 31 January 2014 - 12:26 AM.

  • 0
I have identified the problem: "maverick" -Daniel Beaver

#15 Ganjou

Ganjou

    Member

  • Members
  • 1 posts

Posted 17 March 2014 - 04:03 AM

I've been brooding these forums for a long time and it's refreshing to see a well written write-up like this. What CAD software did you use?

-Edit: Sorry for necro >.>

Edited by Ganjou, 17 March 2014 - 04:09 AM.

  • 0

#16 Naturalman7

Naturalman7

    Member

  • Contributors
  • 158 posts
  • Location:Boise, Idaho
  • State:Idaho
  • Country:United States

Posted 23 March 2014 - 09:02 AM

What CAD software did you use?


I used Autodesk Inventor. I just realized that the CAD drawings are really big. I'll fix that...
  • 0



Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: homemade, writeup, pumpaction, SNAP, spring

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users