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Blaster Trigger Action Dictionary

Single-action, Semi-Auto, Full Auto

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#1 Zack the Mack

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 12:14 AM

There seems to be a lot of confusion regarding trigger actions in multi-shot Nerf blasters. Terms like semiautomatic and automatic get thrown around in the wrong contexts, leaving a lot of confusion. I've outlined the basic trigger action styles here, with examples. These definitions apply to any Nerf blaster with a mechanism for loading subsequent shots. Single-shot blasters like the Nite Finder that require manual reloading don't count.

Single Action - In a single-action blaster, a new dart will not automatically load and the blaster must be primed again before another shot is fired. The user must manually turn a turret, pull a lever, tilt the blaster forward, etc to load the next round. Modded blasters that use the Firefly turret, shotgun speed-loaders, RSCB's and inline clips are single action. Single-action blasters have the lowest rate of fire of repeating blasters, since the user must do two actions to fire a new round.

Double Action - In a double-action blaster, the blaster must be primed before each shot. Unlike a single-action blaster, the act of priming or firing a double-action blaster causes another dart to load. This eliminates the action of manually advancing the mechanism. Most revolvers, such as the Maverick, Fury Fire, Doomsayer, and Firefly are double-action. In addition, the Longshot and Recon are double-action, since they must be primed before each shot. Double-action blasters have higher rate of fire than single-action blasters, but the need to re-prime makes them slower than semi- or full-auto blasters.

Semi-Automatic - Once a semi-automatic blaster is primed, multiple shots can be fired without needing to manually advance or re-prime. Pulling the trigger automatically advances and releases a new round. However, continuing to pull the trigger does not cause additional rounds to be fired. The Hornet is the most common semi-automatic blaster at this point. Semi-automatic blasters can fire as rapidly as the user can pull the trigger, giving them excellent rate of fire.

Automatic - Also called fully automatic. Once an automatic blaster is primed and the trigger is pulled, darts will continue to advance and fire until the trigger is released. This gives the blaster unbeatable rate of fire, since the rate that darts are released is only limited by the speed of the mechanism. Common automatic blasters are the Magstrike, Vulcan, and Tommy 20.

Preemptive Q and A:
Q: But I thought my Longshot was semi-auto! A: Fire a shot and pull the trigger again. If another dart doesn't fire, it ain't semi-auto.
Q: You don't know what you're talking about. A: Entirely possible - if you spot an error, let me know.
Q: How can it be double-action? Nerf blasters don't have hammers! A: Double and single action are based on their definitions for revolvers. A double-action revolver also advances the cylinder. Some liberty was taken here, since double-action revolvers are technically semi-automatic.
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#2 Keith

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 01:32 AM

Q: How can it be double-action? Nerf blasters don't have hammers! A: Double and single action are based on their definitions for revolvers. A double-action revolver also advances the cylinder. Some liberty was taken here, since double-action revolvers are technically semi-automatic.


This may be a bit off-topic since it's not Nerf, but single action and double action are not exclusive to revolvers.
In real firearms this just means that pulling the trigger also primes it. For example; 1911 .45 clones and Browning Hi-Power = single action. Glock anything, Beretta 92 (and most modern pistols) = double action.
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#3 Spud Spudoni

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 09:10 AM

Isn't the double shot technically a semi auto blaster?
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#4 CaptainSlug

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 09:28 AM

There seems to be a lot of confusion regarding trigger actions in multi-shot Nerf blasters. Terms like semiautomatic and automatic get thrown around in the wrong contexts, leaving a lot of confusion.

I haven't seen this confusion you speak of. The terms semi-auto and auto have primarily been used correctly here.
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#5 CA13

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 10:13 AM

Single action by definition would actually require the gun to be cocked before shooting, and double action would just be that the gun would cock itself and shoot with the pull of the trigger. Almost no Nerf guns ("springers") are double action, and air guns still require actuation. The Double-shot still requires a boxlock-imitation action to be cocked, but you don't notice that you are cocking when you are reloading, giving the illusion of double action.

In the end, no Nerf guns are double action and Nerf should never be compared to real firearms. Ever.
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#6 Talio

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 10:44 AM

Yeah, this is pointless.
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#7 Zack the Mack

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 12:09 PM

I wrote this in response to this thread in particular. I feel like having concrete definitions helps avoid ambiguity.

Single- and double-action in this context refer to whether a new round is automatically chambered or not.

After reading the responses, I feel like I created more confusion than I was trying to solve, and have cluttered the board. If this isn't necessary, you know what to do, close 'er on up.
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#8 2iko

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 12:21 PM

Well, I think it sums everything up perfectly, and I do believe there are a lot of noobs who think their longshot or maverick is semi-auto, I've personally seen it far too often. I also love the usage of double action to describe guns which auto load the next round but don't prime.

Good work and I think this should be the standard when people use these terms here (because they do).
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#9 CaptainSlug

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 12:30 PM

Neither of the terms "single-action" or "double-action" will work in all situations, because they are fire-arm terms that only refer to the trigger and whether or not it also performs the action of priming the hammer.

A Maverick or Firefly, or DTB are sort-of "double-action" because the trigger performs two actions by both rotatng the turret, and tripping the catchplate.
A Longshot and Recon are not "double-action" because the trigger only performs one action. The breech is cycled by the priming action.

Stop trying to equate fire-arm terminology to Nerf. Most of it is not applicable. I avoided using it in the wiki because it will only confuse people. Simply state whether the turret or breech is manually-advanced, or automatically-advanced by another mechanism.

Edited by CaptainSlug, 17 July 2009 - 12:33 PM.

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#10 2iko

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 12:36 PM

Okay, so then Recons and LSs are bolt action? That would be the definition of bolt action. Add that one to the list! XD
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#11 Oni Kadaki

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 01:18 PM

Okay, so then Recons and LSs are bolt action? That would be the definition of bolt action. Add that one to the list! XD


By his definition, they would be double action, as the act of priming the blaster also loads the next shot without any additional effort.

Zack, I like your system overall. Though the other posters are right in your usage of these terms doesn't exactly match their usage regarding firearms, I really don't think that's a problem. Good work.
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#12 Talio

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 03:43 PM

Okay, obviously you kids can't take a fucking hint.
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