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#1 Grenado

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Posted 31 January 2007 - 08:01 PM

I've got to do a science project for school, and I want to make it nerf related. I was thinking of making a cannon like the BS-2 and experiment with different barrels, darts, and gases, like gasoline, CO2, and compressed air. I'm going to use PVC couplers so I can change the barrels, and a set of valves so I can change tanks. Any suggestions? I'm a high school student.
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#2 The Crackerjack Man

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Posted 31 January 2007 - 08:51 PM

Just a heads up CO2 doesn't go good with PVC and good luck.

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Edited by The_Crackerjack_Man, 31 January 2007 - 08:51 PM.

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#3 Grenado

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Posted 31 January 2007 - 09:46 PM

Does brass work with gasoline? I know it works with compressed air and CO2.
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#4 The Crackerjack Man

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Posted 31 January 2007 - 10:57 PM

It should but I would check with someone else whos used that before.
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#5 Carbon

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Posted 31 January 2007 - 11:58 PM

I was thinking of making a cannon like the BS-2 and experiment with different barrels, darts, and gases, like gasoline, CO2, and compressed air.

Are you making a combustion gun or a compressed gas gun? Because a gun that uses CO2 won't use gasoline, and vice versa. Even if you are making a combustion cannon, gasoline isn't a great idea. You'd be better off reading spudgun forums for ideas along those lines.
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#6 Grenado

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 08:52 AM

As said before, I was planning on following Boltsniper's BS-2 design, only making it so it has interchangeable tanks.
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#7 SHADOW HUNTER ALPHA

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 11:37 PM

As said before, I was planning on following Boltsniper's BS-2 design, only making it so it has interchangeable tanks.


I don't think he was talking about the tanks, but the propellants. Also, maybe it would be wiser to avoid highly volatile liquids...
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#8 Carbon

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Posted 03 February 2007 - 11:35 AM

As said before, I was planning on following Boltsniper's BS-2 design, only making it so it has interchangeable tanks.

Yes, you said that, but the types of fuels/gases you were mentioning don't go together, or are already used together.

The BC-2 already uses fuel plus compressed air, so I'm wondering what you mean by different gases such as "CO2, gasoline and compressed air". (The tank is primed with fuel, pressurized, and then a portion is let into the firing chamber.) You could pressurize it with CO2, but it wouldn't fire. You could replace fuel with CO2 and pressurize it, but likewise, it won't fire.

Like Shadow Hunter mentioned, less volatile fuels would be a good idea. Specifically, gasoline is dangerous. The BC-2 is essentially a spudgun modified for stefans, so your best bet is to read a spudgun forum and learn about what kind of fuels you can experiment with.

Good practice for a science experiment is to limit the number of variables that you work with, and increase the number of constants. Such as, same darts, same barrels, same pressure of the fuel, but vary the kind of fuel you're using. This will give you directly comparable results, and also focus exactly what you're studying (are you experimenting to determine power of type of fuel? Dart efficiency? Barrel friction? Effect of compression of fuel on combustion efficiency?) Pick one variable and study it, making everything else constant, rather than leaving everything up to a variable.

Edited by Carbon, 03 February 2007 - 11:38 AM.

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