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Beginner's Guide To Machining Plastics


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#26 CaptainSlug

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Posted 02 March 2008 - 10:57 PM

Define "cold". All of the plastics listed in the first post are stable at temperatures from 0F to 100F.
Delrin, Nylon, and PVC have the highest resistance to temperatures below 0F. But if you're talking below -40F (or above 150F) you can't really use most plastics safely.

Edited by CaptainSlug, 02 March 2008 - 10:59 PM.

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Posted 24 October 2008 - 03:40 PM

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#28 nerfer9

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Posted 24 October 2008 - 04:05 PM

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#29 CaptainSlug

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Posted 24 October 2008 - 04:33 PM

Added Polystyrene and Nylon to the first post.
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#30 TheNerfLoki

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 04:57 PM

I have a few questions. To machine extruded acrylic with a dremel, what cutting bit should I use? And should I be worried about the fumes? And which scroll saw that is cheap (100 or less) would any of you recommend? Thanks.

Edited by TheNerfLoki, 30 November 2008 - 04:57 PM.

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#31 CaptainSlug

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Posted 30 November 2008 - 05:20 PM

I have a few questions.
1. To machine extruded acrylic with a dremel, what cutting bit should I use?
2. And should I be worried about the fumes?
3. And which scroll saw that is cheap (100 or less) would any of you recommend? Thanks.

1. The only bits that will work are the high speed cutter types. Everything else will just produce a great deal of melting.
2. Yes, which is why abrasive tools are not a particularly good choice for cutting plastics.
3. Any model by Ryobi, DeWalt, Delta, or Dremel will do fine. The only model I have heard bad things about is the one Sears currently sells under their Craftsman brand.
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#32 cheesypiza001

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 02:48 AM

Whenever I spray-paint a plunger rod/handle (i.e. the one on the TTG), the paint never completely sticks to the rod. Also, after playing around with the rod, I realized that it seems to be made of a certain type of plastic that is unlike the plastic used in the shell of the gun. I have yet to find an adhesive that will bond a broken plunger rod I have. I have already tired Goop, Plastic Welder, and Gorilla Glue, all of which have failed. I am thinking about solvent welding however, I know that that specific technique can only be used on certain types of plastics. If anyone can tell me the name of the material that plunger rods are made of (specifically the LnL's plunger rod), I would greatly appreciate it. Lastly, if anyone can inform me of the strongest adhesive for said material, that would be great too. Thanks so much in advance.
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#33 spartan062

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Posted 24 May 2009 - 12:32 PM

If I am not wrong, the material is ABS. By the way, try Krylon Fusion for Plastics, It may solve your paint sticking problem.
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#34 CaptainSlug

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 06:22 AM

I have yet to find an adhesive that will bond a broken plunger rod I have.

That's because you can't. The material at the break has failed at a polymer chain level and is too weak for an adhesive joint to take hold.
You have to add extra material so that you can make adhesive bonds away from the point of failure.

The strongest adhesive I've used regularly is JB Weld 2-part epoxy steel.

Edited by CaptainSlug, 25 May 2009 - 06:24 AM.

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#35 A side of nerf

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 11:04 AM

I have yet to find an adhesive that will bond a broken plunger rod I have.

The strongest adhesive I've used regularly is JB Weld 2-part epoxy steel.

It's also a very user-friendly adhesive. It is very easy to use and is more of a paste rather then most clay-like epoxy putty's. It's great for creating structural integrity and can be used to repair key parts in blasters that have constant stress on them.
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#36 Lt Stefan

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Posted 07 July 2009 - 11:25 AM

In the drop-down menu on tap plastics it says 1/8" (.118) except the thing is 1/8 does not equal .118. So which dimension is it?
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#37 Lt Stefan

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Posted 07 July 2009 - 02:26 PM

O ok I didn't realize that.
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#38 wingd man

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Posted 07 July 2009 - 09:13 PM

While this topic is up I'd like to ask if PVC/ CPVC sheets exist, and if not, why not? (Since it's cheap and durable.)

EDIT: Never mind, googled it.

Edited by wing'd man, 07 July 2009 - 09:41 PM.

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#39 Lt Stefan

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 09:55 AM

Can a miter saw be used to cut polycarbonate tube?
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#40 Lt Stefan

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 11:48 AM

I use it to cut PVC and it works perfectly. And yes it is powered. It has a 12" blade with 60 teeth if that helps. And the PVC doesn't melt. Nor did a LS clip that I cut with it.
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#41 CaptainSlug

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 11:52 AM

I use it to cut PVC and it works perfectly. And yes it is powered. It has a 12" blade with 60 teeth if that helps. And the PVC doesn't melt. Nor did a LS clip that I cut with it.

Then it will cut fine. Polycarbonate has a much higher melting temperature than either of those plastics.
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#42 Lt Stefan

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 04:25 PM

Great, thanks for the help.
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#43 moosa

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Posted 27 February 2010 - 06:17 AM

I've used the normal abrasive cutting wheels to cut Nerf plastic with my Dremel without problems. I don't push it too hard.

Also, Dremel now sells cutting wheels made specifically for plastics.
Link here.
They appear to also be abrasive type cutters. I have yet to use them.

Edited by moosa, 27 February 2010 - 06:18 AM.

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Yes.

#44 knexpert66

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Posted 06 December 2010 - 06:04 PM

I know this isn't plastic, but a good alternative to polycarb is partical board. Its definitly not as strong. But its cheap, easy to find, and its pretty strong.
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#45 polycarb

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Posted 06 December 2010 - 06:45 PM

Particle board is a manufactured wood product. It is actually quite environmentally friendly, as it is built from compressed shredded wood scraps and recycled wood, held together with a type of resin. It is cheaper and more dense than hardwood, but is not very strong or resistant to moisture. It also does not take paint (let alone stain) well.
(For anybody who cares, from http://woodworking.a...icleBoard.htm.)
Also, I doubt it could hold a thread.

So, no, it doesn't seem like a good alternative.
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#46 Draconis

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Posted 06 December 2010 - 06:53 PM

Particle board is a manufactured wood product. It is actually quite environmentally friendly, as it is built from compressed shredded wood scraps and recycled wood, held together with a type of resin. It is cheaper and more dense than hardwood, but is not very strong or resistant to moisture. It also does not take paint (let alone stain) well.
(For anybody who cares, from http://woodworking.a...icleBoard.htm.)
Also, I doubt it could hold a thread.

So, no, it doesn't seem like a good alternative.


Oh, I don't know... It holds pegs perfectly.
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#47 gmzamz

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Posted 06 December 2010 - 11:40 PM

I've used the normal abrasive cutting wheels to cut Nerf plastic with my Dremel without problems. I don't push it too hard.

Also, Dremel now sells cutting wheels made specifically for plastics.
Link here.
They appear to also be abrasive type cutters. I have yet to use them.

I've used those before, not too hard, but they seem to work just fine. DON'T ever get melted plastic on the cutting side, it's a pain in the *** to get off.
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