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homemade nerf gun snap easy beginner snapbow clothespin homemade diy

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#1 jboynerf345

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 04:07 PM

Intended for this contest but can/will serve as your normal writeup for other purposes. 

 

This blaster is meant for new guys who have been exposed, usually online, to this little realm of nerf called DIY/NIC/whatever community involves relatively powerful homemade nerf blaster, and want to get involved. They don't have the tools and resources required to build impressive +bows and rainbowpumps that are relevant and made standard through popular media sources, and are intimated and frustrated. Here are the design goals, paraphrased from the contest thread, that we will try to meet:

·       Minimize special tools (large machinery, 3-d printers, etc.) and parts (in our case, polycarb, mcmaster springs, thinwall pvc, etc.)

·       Minimize cost and build time

·       Be competitive in wars (to a degree); much better then the modded stryfe you were planning to show up with. 

·       Be safe and easy to use 

 

Overview of the SNAP 

 

Snaps are known to be cheap and easy to make. Many people can argue that SNAPS are inferior to more sophisticated homemades, and are right to an extent. SNAPS can never achieve the elegance of a +bow, or the insane durability and reliability of rainbows. In terms of performance, this really is a point that cannot be debated IMO. Theoretically, I can conclude a perfect rainbow is more "powerful" then the most perfect SNAP, but I have yet to meet anyone with either. For me, I have always used SNAPS and am able to be fairly competitive...hopefully some people can back me up on that haha. (Note: anyone who says that a homemade is more accurate then another, that's stupid, accuracy depends entirely on the quality of dart). 

 

The SNAP is built out of common plumbing materials found at hardware stores, plus a strong clothespin, washers, and a spring. The explanation of it's operation can be found here, as well as various other resources on this website. It's a simple concept, and will be made clearer as we progress in building our blaster. 

 

Some great resources of other SNAP tutorials and explanations can be 

·       Rork's Snapbow Tutorial 

·       Superlative Plunger Head

·       NoM's Video Snapbow Tutorial

 

Cost and Materials/Tools Guide

 

S68TKF1l.jpg

 

Note-There is a significant difference between Sch. 40 PVC and CPVC. Be wary

·       2x 1"-1/2" bushing (one for the front, one for the back)

·       1 1/4" PVC (you will need about 11" of it, but go ahead and get more anyway)

·       1/2" CPVC Tee (the thing you use to prime the thing)

·       1/2" CPVC Endcap 

·       1/2" CPVC (you'll need a good amount, get a lot)

·       2x 1/4" 1 1/4" washers (basically a 1/4" type washer with a diameter of 1 1/4")

·       1/4" 1 1/4" Neoprene washer (might have to dig around for these a bit) 

·       1/4" 1 1/2" Neoprene washer

·       1/4" 1 1/4" long bolt

·       2x 1/4" nuts

·       Industrial strength clothespin (preferably plastic. Wood ones are usable but trickier to use in my experience. If you can't find any at all, I use these)

·       "L" bracket (I prefer the 1 1/2" ones)

·       JB Weld (not the 2 part kind, the clay-like one)

·       Roofing nail

·       Some #6 3/8" screws (get a bunch, especially if planning on working on future projects) 

·       2x HOMEDEPOT Everbilt springs found here (used commonly in Nitefinders)

·       Handle from an old nerf blaster (Wood can be nicer, but thats more materials and work) 

 

 

·       Drill with 7/64 bit, 7/32 bit, a bit a bit bigger then the roofing nail, and a 3/8 or 1/2 if you got it handy 

·       Screwdriver

·       Hot glue gun with lots of glue 

·       Pliers

·       Something to cut a handle off with, e.g. hacksaw, dremel

·       Dremel (would be nice)

·       Bolt cutter/ pliers 

       Etape 

 

Total Cost (everything that you buy; you might only need 11" of 1 1/4" PVC, but you have to get 2 ft.): $37.56 

You now have enough materials; building a second, identical blaster will be under $10.

 

Build time - 30-60 min depending on experience.

Build time+Cure time - 6-7 hrs  

 

On to the construction

 

The Plunger Head 

 

The plunger head is a assembly of washers and e-putty that basically makes the blaster work. It makes an airtight seal, and also is the way the blaster catches. 

 

Drill a CENTERED 7/32 hole in the CPVC endcap

 

KRwJYtIl.jpg

 

Insert you bolt though the bottom of the endcap, and assemble your washers like so. Make sure the bolts are tight. 

 

1kmqFKel.jpg

 

Take a good amount of epoxy putty and create a ramp to the bottom washer. 

 

SPlfGfEl.jpg

 

Let it set for a good amount of time. 

 

The Trigger 

 

Cut the end of the clothespin off so that spring is close to the edge.

 

no1pyZrl.jpg

 

Cut your roofing nail to size. The general length can vary between 0.8"-1.2". Start off big, the cut lower if needed. Using a dremel, or sandpaper, smooth and round the top of the nail.

 

TYxuBKCl.jpg

 

Using the "bit a bit bigger then the roofing nail", drill through the clothespin. Stick your nail completely though it, and fill the gap with epoxy putty. Attach your L bracket to the end of the clothespin. 

 

ZpEFMyAl.jpg

 

The Plunger Tube and Plunger Rod

 

Cut the 1 1/4" PVC to 11". 

 

jsTqiawl.jpg

 

Using the reducer bushing, wrap etape around the bottom of the bushing until the bushing fits snugly in one end of the tube. 

 

emEYiFul.jpg

 

Hot glue the bushing into place, drill and screw the screws into the bushing. Before you insert the screws, add some hot glue into the holes before you screw the screws in. 

 

soBlgZCl.jpg

 

Assemble the plunger head, springs, the other bushing, and the CPVC tee like so. Screw the CPVC tee in place. 

 

2VYxAcWl.jpg

 

Drill a hole 4" from the back of the plunger tube with the "bit a bit bigger then the roofing nail." 

 

mArQwOfl.jpg

 

Hot glue the trigger into place, and add zip-ties to secure the trigger in place if wanted. At this point, you can test to see if the blaster catches. If it feels like the ramp is barely touching the nail, your nail is too short. If your blaster is "falsely catching", your nail is too long. You can adjust your nail until it catches. After a while, you develop an intuition and will get it on the first try. There is no calculation or measuring required, I just eye it. 

 

5V6bEchl.jpg

 

 

Hot glue the handle onto the back of the blaster, next to the trigger. You will probably need a lot hot glue for this, but the resulting bond will be pretty strong. 

 

PbeqrXrl.jpg

 

Screw the bushing on the plunger rod on the back of the plunger tube. 

 

Drill some vent holes above the handle, with your 1/2 or 3/8 bit.

 

If everything is dry, and you tested it already, good job. Go fling some foam.

 

Conclusion 

 

znc0X3xl.jpg

 

Making a barrel-since every barrel material is uncommon, besides CPVC, use CPVC, no matter what darts you have. In the picture and testing, I'm using a ridiculously long barrel. I would get better ranges with a shorter barrel.

 

Using a 4-dart RSCB, I'm hitting low 70's, and with a speedloader, I'm hitting low 80's. A hopper works, but a RSCB seems more efficient. In a war, if you are the type of player that relies on speed and dodging instead of cover, you can be reasonably (but not fully) competitive. 

 

Going Further

 

 

If you really want...Beginners Rainbowpump

 

First writeup, welcome to criticism, questions, and miscellaneous comments. Again, this writeup is geared for the contest as opposed to a random writeup.


Edited by jboynerf345, 19 June 2016 - 07:56 PM.

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#2 The Manta

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 05:51 PM

Looks nice! Kind of off topic, but for the RSCB, I highly recommend using a "street" elbow or tee, which reduces deadspace by a sizable amount and looks MUCH cleaner. This is what I'm talking about, it might be officially called something else.


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#3 jboynerf345

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 06:38 PM

Looks nice! Kind of off topic, but for the RSCB, I highly recommend using a "street" elbow or tee, which reduces deadspace by a sizable amount and looks MUCH cleaner. This is what I'm talking about, it might be officially called something else.

 

Thanks...good to know, I don't use RSCB's, and they are kind of out of date anyway, but I like the style. Would probably be a bit more relevant for "the chopper".


Edited by jboynerf345, 19 June 2016 - 10:03 PM.

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#4 Carbon

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 07:33 PM

Nice writeup!
 
Suggestions:

Trigger Assembly: Currently, you have the builder fill in the clothespin with epoxy putty before testing to see if the nail has been cut to the right length. Not a problem if it's too long, but a PITA if it's been cut too short, as you have to dig out the putty to replace the nail. (Personally, I prefer wood clothespins. Never had an issue, and they don't need to be filled in).
 
Handle: I find that handles held on with only adhesive are a Bad Idea, and will fail at the worst possible moment. Go with mechanical fasteners.
 

SNAPS can never achieve...the insane durability and reliability of rainbows. In terms of performance, this really is a point that cannot be debated IMO.

 

I have a nine year old SNAP (used at every war I've attended) that would like a word with you.


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#5 jboynerf345

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 07:54 PM

Nice writeup!
 
Suggestions:

Trigger Assembly: Currently, you have the builder fill in the clothespin with epoxy putty before testing to see if the nail has been cut to the right length. Not a problem if it's too long, but a PITA if it's been cut too short, as you have to dig out the putty to replace the nail. (Personally, I prefer wood clothespins. Never had an issue, and they don't need to be filled in).
 
Handle: I find that handles held on with only adhesive are a Bad Idea, and will fail at the worst possible moment. Go with mechanical fasteners.
 

 

I have a nine year old SNAP (used at every war I've attended) that would like a word with you.

 

In response to trigger - Knocking out the putty, which is what I do when something is wrong, is a lot easier than "digging it out". Another alternative is adding an extra layer of putty to the ramp. I admit that it can be fickle, but really can't be avoided when using a plastic clothespin. On that note, common wooden clothespins are generally smaller and weaker. In my experience, they crack easily when drilled into, and are generally unreliable. 

 

In response to handle - This is a tricky topic. For my blasters I use wood handles attached via thinwall, but this requires a lot more work cutting out the handle (which I take forever on), and acquiring thinwall/spending another 10 min and a dremel sanding out a 1 1/4" coupler.  Most people have blasters that they can give up, whereas buying wood can add to the cost pretty dramatically. Additionally, I've seen a number of reputable builders hot glue handles. It's a lot stronger then most people think. 

 

Your snaps are special lol :)


Edited by jboynerf345, 19 June 2016 - 07:54 PM.

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#6 Carbon

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 09:24 PM

In response to trigger - Knocking out the putty, which is what I do when something is wrong, is a lot easier than "digging it out". Another alternative is adding an extra layer of putty to the ramp. I admit that it can be fickle, but really can't be avoided when using a plastic clothespin.

 
Fair enough. My point was more that it's easier to check your nail length before epoxying it in, saving time and putty. Nails are cheap...if it's too short, just cut a new one, rather than unnecessarily adding putty to your ramp and waiting for that to dry (I'm impatient and cheap...which is why I don't like using epoxy putty in the first place).
 

On that note, common wooden clothespins are generally smaller and weaker. In my experience, they crack easily when drilled into, and are generally unreliable.


As far as wooden clothespins being too weak...they don't have to be that strong in the first place ("Weak clothespins" is a SNAP myth that I try to dispel). If clothespins are breaking, it's indicative of other problems in the build (something I discuss here). If they're cracking when you drill them, your bit may be dull and gouging/breaking the wood rather than cleanly cutting it. But that discussion is neither here nor there as far as your writeup is concerned :)
 

In response to handle - This is a tricky topic. For my blasters I use wood handles attached via thinwall, but this requires a lot more work cutting out the handle (which I take forever on), and acquiring thinwall/spending another 10 min and a dremel sanding out a 1 1/4" coupler.  Most people have blasters that they can give up, whereas buying wood can add to the cost pretty dramatically. Additionally, I've seen a number of reputable builders hot glue handles. It's a lot stronger then most people think.

 
Handle construction is a matter of opinion, so I'll leave that alone. However, while hot glue (particularly hot melt) can be quite strong, I had some soften on me (and subsequently fail) after a blaster sat in full sunshine at SPANO. Handles are a high stress point, and while they can work fine with just adhesive, it's not the best idea.


Edited by Carbon, 19 June 2016 - 09:27 PM.

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#7 jboynerf345

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 09:43 PM

 
Fair enough. My point was more that it's easier to check your nail length before epoxying it in, saving time and putty. Nails are cheap...if it's too short, just cut a new one, rather than unnecessarily adding putty to your ramp and waiting for that to dry (I'm impatient and cheap...which is why I don't like using epoxy putty in the first place).
 


As far as wooden clothespins being too weak...they don't have to be that strong in the first place ("Weak clothespins" is a SNAP myth that I try to dispel). If clothespins are breaking, it's indicative of other problems in the build (something I discuss here). If they're cracking when you drill them, your bit may be dull and gouging/breaking the wood rather than cleanly cutting it. But that discussion is neither here nor there as far as your writeup is concerned :)
 

 
Handle construction is a matter of opinion, so I'll leave that alone. However, while hot glue (particularly hot melt) can be quite strong, I had some soften on me (and subsequently fail) after a blaster sat in full sunshine at SPANO. Handles are a high stress point, and while they can work fine with just adhesive, it's not the best idea.

 

Thanks for all the constructive criticism, means a lot. 

 

I think that you are missing my point. Hacking out a handle from a old blaster and adhering it is cheaper and easier to produce then cutting out a wood handle and attaching it to something or screwing it in from the top. I agree that with time and materials there are much better ways of constructing handles, but this way is the easiest. 

 

Since northeast summer wars are pretty mild, I personally don't have any troubles due to heat. 


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#8 Carbon

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Posted 19 June 2016 - 10:38 PM

I think that you are missing my point. Hacking out a handle from a old blaster and adhering it is cheaper and easier to produce then cutting out a wood handle and attaching it to something or screwing it in from the top. I agree that with time and materials there are much better ways of constructing handles, but this way is the easiest.

 

I'm actually not criticizing your choice of handle at all, just how it was attached to the plunger tube. Personally, I'm not wild about cannibalizing blasters for handles, but it's quick and gives a great feeling handle in the process. 
 

Since northeast summer wars are pretty mild, I personally don't have any troubles due to heat.

 

But that may not be the case for the next person to use your writeup, you know? It doesn't have to be screws, zip ties + adhesive works great.


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#9 jboynerf345

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 07:37 AM

 

I'm actually not criticizing your choice of handle at all, just how it was attached to the plunger tube. Personally, I'm not wild about cannibalizing blasters for handles, but it's quick and gives a great feeling handle in the process. 
 

 

But that may not be the case for the next person to use your writeup, you know? It doesn't have to be screws, zip ties + adhesive works great.

Yeah, I'm not a big fan either, but it seems to be the easiest way, and the bond is still competent. I have considered using zip ties, I just don't really see any where I can anchor my mv handle.

 

When I talk about my experience, I had no other experience or accounts to produce information from, so to paraphrase it "in my experience, massive hot glue bonds are competent and war durable."


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#10 Phillip Roy

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 05:35 PM

This is a very nice write-up. Now you got me all nostalgic over the maverick handle. Has anyone made a homemade with a twist fit barrel for elites?
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#11 jboynerf345

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 06:11 PM

This is a very nice write-up. Now you got me all nostalgic over the maverick handle. Has anyone made a homemade with a twist fit barrel for elites?

 

Homemades are generally made for homemade darts, but can also be used for stock darts. CPVC is a pretty tight twist fit for elites, and 17/32 brass is a balance between tight and loose (for elites). I would go with a CPVC,  but that might just be me. Look at the "barrel guide" link, might help you bit. 


Edited by jboynerf345, 20 June 2016 - 06:11 PM.

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#12 Meaker VI

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 06:24 PM

This is a very nice write-up. Now you got me all nostalgic over the maverick handle. Has anyone made a homemade with a twist fit barrel for elites?

 

Nearly all of Boltsniper's blasters used stock darts. I think the FAR was built with suction head/tagger/dome heads in mind, though IIRC his later blasters (BS-12) fire elites or streamlines.

 

As jboynerf says, it's all in the barrel. And loading mech - a hopper won't feed elites, but an RSCB will.


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#13 Spud Spudoni

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Posted 20 June 2016 - 10:27 PM

Forgive me if this comes off as offensive, but what does this writeup provide as a guide that any of the writeups or videos you posted at the beginning of the post couldn't? Wouldn't I be better off reading or watching a tutorial that you based your writeup on, versus looking at the paraphrased one above?


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#14 Langley

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 12:45 AM

 

since every barrel material is uncommon, besides CPVC, use CPVC, no matter what darts you have

 

CPVC is actually not available in many locations where the use of CPVC in plumbing is not up to code.  I'd still recommend it since most stock darts fit in most CPVC, but it might be worth mentioning Sched 80 or brass, or coming up with some more universal alternative (PEX in a PVC sleeve?)

 

 

I think that you are missing my point. Hacking out a handle from a old blaster and adhering it is cheaper and easier to produce then cutting out a wood handle and attaching it to something or screwing it in from the top.

You can take a pretty rough piece of scrap wood and wrap some tape around it and call it a handle, you don't need to do anything fancy with it.  It's not too hard to drill some holes through the top of your PT big enough to fit a screw and a screwdriver through, then pass through those and drill smaller holes through the bottom of the PT into the crude wooden handle, and finally secure it all with a couple of wood screws.  Way more secure than hotglue, and pretty fool proof. 


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#15 Thorn

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 12:48 AM

Nice thread! Personally, after making many snaps with the listed method of making snap triggers, I found that putting the epoxy putty into the clothespin first, then putting a nail through the the epoxy putty and having the head of the nail sit on top of the epoxy putty worked best for me. This way, the nail is held straight and in place by the epoxy putty. When I had the nail seated at the bottom of the clothespin, the lack of support caused the nail to start to wiggle after extended periods of time. Having the extra support from the putty really helps with the stability of the nail.

 

EDIT: Forgot to add, I put the nail through the second bump in the clothespin, rather than the foremost one. I sink it slightly into the epoxy putty so that it is flush with the rest, and then I screw the L bracket over the nail head to ensure it doesn't come out.


Edited by Thorn, 21 June 2016 - 01:06 AM.

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#16 jboynerf345

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 09:54 AM

Forgive me if this comes off as offensive, but what does this writeup provide as a guide that any of the writeups or videos you posted at the beginning of the post couldn't? Wouldn't I be better off reading or watching a tutorial that you based your writeup on, versus looking at the paraphrased one above?

 

No offense taken, I understand completely, and was pondering this for quite a while. The main point of this thread is to provide a different angle to building pretty much identical blasters. Starting off, variety of perspectives is key; as you can see, my style is different then many. Besides, different guides are tailored to different people. The end product is not the same as the other guides listed, despite similarities. I provided different sources because some people might find slightly different and efficient (for them) ways to build a blaster. In the end, all of our designs are mixes of what we have seen and what we come up with. I hope this makes sense.

 

 

CPVC is actually not available in many locations where the use of CPVC in plumbing is not up to code.  I'd still recommend it since most stock darts fit in most CPVC, but it might be worth mentioning Sched 80 or brass, or coming up with some more universal alternative (PEX in a PVC sleeve?)

 

You can take a pretty rough piece of scrap wood and wrap some tape around it and call it a handle, you don't need to do anything fancy with it.  It's not too hard to drill some holes through the top of your PT big enough to fit a screw and a screwdriver through, then pass through those and drill smaller holes through the bottom of the PT into the crude wooden handle, and finally secure it all with a couple of wood screws.  Way more secure than hotglue, and pretty fool proof. 

 

I believe 1/2 PEX is pretty much the same ID, if not a bit smaller then CPVC. Besides, PEX is bought usually slightly curved in some way, and straightening it can be a pain. 

 

Again, I will keep my stance on hot glue bonds. It is not unknown for people to hot glue foregrips and triggers, and is obviously the easiest way. I am not saying that the bond is a lot stronger then mechanically fastening a wood handle to the blaster. Using either the method you mentioned or the coupler/thinwall method, it requires even more work/build time, and can be tricky especially if the builder is a novice with the drill and lacking the tools necessary. 

 

EDIT: Additionally, the stress during operation is not as heavy as a full [k26]. In fact, the compression force is so weak, it has to warrant a bigger plunger tube then I wanted. Besides the abuse to blasters that usually occurs in war, normal operation shouldn't be a problem for the handle. 

 

Nice thread! Personally, after making many snaps with the listed method of making snap triggers, I found that putting the epoxy putty into the clothespin first, then putting a nail through the the epoxy putty and having the head of the nail sit on top of the epoxy putty worked best for me. This way, the nail is held straight and in place by the epoxy putty. When I had the nail seated at the bottom of the clothespin, the lack of support caused the nail to start to wiggle after extended periods of time. Having the extra support from the putty really helps with the stability of the nail.

 

EDIT: Forgot to add, I put the nail through the second bump in the clothespin, rather than the foremost one. I sink it slightly into the epoxy putty so that it is flush with the rest, and then I screw the L bracket over the nail head to ensure it doesn't come out.

 

Thats a good point, never thought of that. My old triggers seem to be operating fine, but that's good to know. 

 

I'm not quite sure what you mean by the "second bump", but for me, I like the end of the L bracket flush with the end of the clothespin for aesthetics. However, this means that a certain amount of the bracket covers the epoxy putty, so I guess you can see it reinforces the epoxy putty itself, and not the nail. 


Edited by jboynerf345, 21 June 2016 - 09:59 AM.

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#17 Meaker VI

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 10:28 AM

CPVC is actually not available in many locations where the use of CPVC in plumbing is not up to code.  I'd still recommend it since most stock darts fit in most CPVC...

 
... As long as you take a dart with you to check the fit. As you know (but others in this thread might not) the ID tolerance on the stuff is terrible, within the same batch there will be great-fit and terrible fit pieces.
 

...but it might be worth mentioning Sched 80 or brass, or coming up with some more universal alternative (PEX in a PVC sleeve?)

 
Have you found PEX to work? I've been experimenting with it as a pusher-breech for a long time because 3/8" PEX is 1/2" OD exactly. I think one of the PEX sizes has a 1/2" ID (probably 1/2"), but I didn't think darts fit well in it. It's a good material to look at because it's got better consistency than PVC and more straightforward sizing. I'd love to find this mystical Sched. 80, but no dice in local stores yet and I'd rather special order aluminum or PETG. Must be an east-coast thing.

 

If you've found or want to start a quest for a universal alternative, I'm down.
 

I believe 1/2 PEX is pretty much the same ID, if not a bit smaller then CPVC. Besides, PEX is bought usually slightly curved in some way, and straightening it can be a pain.

 
Pretty sure 1/2 PEX is 1/2" ID. CPVC is close to that, but the ID tolerance is like +/- 0.1" or something insane. You can buy straight sticks of PEX, usually they are 5' long.
 

Again, I will keep my stance on hot glue bonds. It is not unknown for people to hot glue foregrips and triggers, and is obviously the easiest way. I am not saying that the bond is a lot stronger then mechanically fastening a wood handle to the blaster. Using either the method you mentioned or the coupler/thinwall method, it requires even more work/build time, and can be tricky especially if the builder is a novice with the drill and lacking the tools necessary. 
 
EDIT: Additionally, the stress during operation is not as heavy as a full [k26]. In fact, the compression force is so weak, it has to warrant a bigger plunger tube then I wanted. Besides the abuse to blasters that usually occurs in war, normal operation shouldn't be a problem for the handle.

Hot glue doesn't bond well at all. Many builders back up hot glue with epoxy glue or PVC cement or superglue or something and use the hot glue as structure and (essentially) a spot weld. It holds the part in place quickly and well enough for the real glue to do it's job over it's much longer cure time.

 

Myself, I prefer a mechanical bond on any stressed part. Doing bodywork on a production blaster frequently prevents that, but if you can, always do the mechanical bond.


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#18 jboynerf345

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 10:44 AM

 
... As long as you take a dart with you to check the fit. As you know (but others in this thread might not) the ID tolerance on the stuff is terrible, within the same batch there will be great-fit and terrible fit pieces.
 

 
Have you found PEX to work? I've been experimenting with it as a pusher-breech for a long time because 3/8" PEX is 1/2" OD exactly. I think one of the PEX sizes has a 1/2" ID (probably 1/2"), but I didn't think darts fit well in it. It's a good material to look at because it's got better consistency than PVC and more straightforward sizing. I'd love to find this mystical Sched. 80, but no dice in local stores yet and I'd rather special order aluminum or PETG. Must be an east-coast thing.

 

If you've found or want to start a quest for a universal alternative, I'm down.
 

 
Pretty sure 1/2 PEX is 1/2" ID. CPVC is close to that, but the ID tolerance is like +/- 0.1" or something insane. You can buy straight sticks of PEX, usually they are 5' long.
 

Hot glue doesn't bond well at all. Many builders back up hot glue with epoxy glue or PVC cement or superglue or something and use the hot glue as structure and (essentially) a spot weld. It holds the part in place quickly and well enough for the real glue to do it's job over it's much longer cure time.

 

Myself, I prefer a mechanical bond on any stressed part. Doing bodywork on a production blaster frequently prevents that, but if you can, always do the mechanical bond.

 

In my experience, even the 5 ft lengths are inconsistent in terms of being straight. 

 

I DON'T PREFER adhesive bonding on ANY PART of my blaster. I get it, I hate it. However, for this specific application, hot glue is the most efficient (cheapest, easiest) way to get, in this case, a sufficient bond. 


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Snaps. Snaps. Snaps.

#19 Snoop Doggy doge

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 12:23 PM

It's a bitch to ream, and comes from McMaster Carr  but .495 alu and .527 alu are great barrel materials.
They're supposed to sheath in magic, or 5/8 ID PVC (I reamed mine out with a dremel, I think you can use a 5/8 bit) 
I use .495, it feeds a lot of darts because I have P O W A H and DX Craftsman and CA-99 use .527 in their 4Bs. If you have tighter foam, get .495 and if you have larger foam get .527. 


Also, great guide, it's modern and I get it a bit better. Now I have no excuse to not mass produce snaps for noobs. However, I agree with Langley, you should drill speed holes up top and mechanically fasten the handle, like Chris in his Rainows. You even mentioned it lol. 

 

If you really want...Beginners Rainbowpump

 

Though I'm not sure how well tapping a hollow handle works with that method. 


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#20 jboynerf345

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 09:39 PM

It's a bitch to ream, and comes from McMaster Carr  but .495 alu and .527 alu are great barrel materials.
They're supposed to sheath in magic, or 5/8 ID PVC (I reamed mine out with a dremel, I think you can use a 5/8 bit) 
I use .495, it feeds a lot of darts because I have P O W A H and DX Craftsman and CA-99 use .527 in their 4Bs. If you have tighter foam, get .495 and if you have larger foam get .527. 


Also, great guide, it's modern and I get it a bit better. Now I have no excuse to not mass produce snaps for noobs. However, I agree with Langley, you should drill speed holes up top and mechanically fasten the handle, like Chris in his Rainows. You even mentioned it lol. 

 

 

Though I'm not sure how well tapping a hollow handle works with that method. 

 

You better start building snaps lol.

 

I added the rainbow link so that people could begin to build rainbows if they like what homemades can produce but doesn't like snaps (who would ever do that XD). 


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Snaps. Snaps. Snaps.

#21 Snoop Doggy doge

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Posted 22 June 2016 - 12:20 AM

lmao help me build enough for my APOC Noob army of plus ones,
Snaps are great for o shit I'm broke, but I have rainbow material. Just too lazy to make the catch, but I can do *literally* everything else. Same thing with the snap catch too lmao, but that's just me not liking snaps ;) [Tell me when your snap takes 30 kg bruh]


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