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Integration?

What are some good ways to integrate two blasters

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#1 CelloGuy

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Posted 07 May 2015 - 07:28 PM

So I was thinking about starting some integrations and I don't really know how I want to go about it. I know a lot of people use epoxy putty but to me that looks super sloppy. I think I can try and use JB weld or rubber cement but I'm not sure how well it will look. I honestly just need a lot of help. Thanks
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#2 meishel

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Posted 07 May 2015 - 07:40 PM

JB Weld IS epoxy. People's integrations look sloppy for the most part because they are sloppy. Putting some water on your fingers when working the epoxy can give you a much smoother line, and you can sand it after it dries. You CAN get decently nice lines with Epoxy Putty, but it takes a lot of work. Also, you can use fillers like Milliput (Still an epoxy) which is more workable. Measure twice, cut once and all that applies here as well.
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#3 CelloGuy

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Posted 07 May 2015 - 07:48 PM

Okay, but as far as cutting goes, Im probably going to use my ban saw to make the cuts but how can I get the Epoxy or whatever to be flat and smooth?
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#4 Birch

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Posted 07 May 2015 - 08:45 PM

As far as integrations go, there are many ways to do them, but there are some things that will help to make a stable and clean connection. Firstly, you'll want to choose your adhesives. I have done one integration previously, and what I used turned out pretty well.

For most of the shell-to-shell contact, you will want to use solvent weld (pvc cement, the all purpose stuff (red can)), in conjunction with a solid liquid epoxy. The cement should go only where plastic touches other plastic, and the epoxy should go everywhere else on the bond. JB weld, aroldite or any other epoxy that works well with plastics will be fine. To add structural stability I would add some epoxy putty, or adhere some polycarbonate or metal bolts between the connection. This will do the majority of the structural support. To make the bond smooth and clean, use a dent filler thing called Bondo. This is used in auto restoration and repair to take out dents and such and is easily sanded and smoothed. Be careful to avoid over application of the Bondo, as it will take awhile to sand.
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#5 Astech

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Posted 17 May 2015 - 04:31 AM

Okay, but as far as cutting goes, Im probably going to use my ban saw to make the cuts but how can I get the Epoxy or whatever to be flat and smooth?


I believe a common method is to use epoxy putty or some other strong adhesive to provide the bond strength, wait for it to dry/set, then mold modelling clay/plastic over the top to the desired shape. There are some pretty seamless integrations out there using a similar system.

Edited by Astech, 17 May 2015 - 04:32 AM.

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#6 ravetrooper

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Posted 19 May 2015 - 12:47 AM

Using tactical rails is great for hardware only integrations. Get some small machine screws and matching nuts, drill some holes along each rail, butterfly the blaster, then place the screws in one side of blaster A and the nuts in the same side of blaster B and tighten them, then put your shells back together. This is the cleanest way I've found so far. Coop has a great video tutorial here:

Alternatively, when using adhesives, I try to cut my two shells so that there are some overlapping or somehow interlocking parts, then use high-temp hot glue on the inside, JB Water-weld on the outside, let cure and sand smooth.
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Gut the electronics, drill a hole in the shell, and attach a crank to the gear. Bam, crank-action stampede that doesn't require batteries, or even a trigger.

...(also judging by your past posts, I would consider you pretty dang wise elder like in the modding community :lol: )



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