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Nerf gun motors, problems and solutions

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#1 Super0dp

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 02:39 PM

Alright, I recently got a stampede and tore it apart for parts. I was messing with the motor and took it apart and found it was brushed. That means that there are carbon-metal brushes that contact the armature. (the spiny thingy in the center) these brushes wear out overtime and you will have to replace your motor. If you have done a voltage mod this happens a lot faster. Brushed motors generate a lot of heat so be careful. My suggestion is to find a similarly sized motor that is brushless, and replace you existing motor. Brushless motors spin a lot faster so mor stress would be put on the gears. Also they take a lot less voltage to go fast so you can save some money on batteries. Hope this helps!

Edited by Super0dp, 18 October 2012 - 11:13 AM.

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#2 MavericK96

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 03:40 PM

Would be cool if you actually had some info about what replacement motor would be suitable, because AFAIK most of the aftermarket motors people have found are too big and require reaming out the plastic inside to get it to fit.
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#3 Briguy52

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 02:12 PM

Brushless motors spin a lot faster so mor stress would be put on the gears. Also they take a lot less voltage to go fast so you can save some money on batteries. Hope this helps!


More or less, ALL Nerf electronic blasters (flywheel or AEG style like the Stampede)feature brushed (or traditional) motors. For those of you who don't exactly know what a brushed motor is, it is simply your basic motor that comes in small hand held fans, cheap toy cars, etc. So, what's the big difference?

A brushless motor has far less friction compared to a brushed motor; therefore, you will be able to revolve at higher velocities/torque with less heat build up, less friction resistance, and less sound. If you want to know why, Wikipedia is out there for you.

However, in order to even use a brushless motor and reap its benefits, you need an electronic speed control. You can't just replace a brushed motor with a brushless motor and expect it to work like a charm. Though I am not an expert, my father's been tinkering around with RC air planes for quite a while and I can safely tell you that it's simply not possible.



On another note, as an owner of a gear-shredded Stampede, I can also tell you that if your problem is shredded gears, switching motors is NOT going to help. You are going to either want to reduce the load on your gears (ie toning down the voltage, spring, etc.) OR get some custom gears more durable than the Nylon or whatever type of flimsy plastic Hasbro made their gears out of.

Edited by Briguy52, 26 August 2012 - 02:16 PM.

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#4 Super0dp

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 11:16 AM

I found a motor for barricade/rayven/stockade blasters.The Tamiya plasma dash motor (The small one, Duh!) is a perfect fit with minimal trimming and is brushless. They are the kind of motors found in the Tamiya mini 4x4 things.
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#5 Langley

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 11:35 AM

Holy shit, totally justified necro. Got a part number or a product link?
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#6 Super0dp

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 11:42 AM

Holy shit, totally justified necro. Got a part number or a product link?


I dont have a part number but if you go to the Tamiya U.S. website you can find the mini 4x4 and the parts. I'm sure with 15 min of google searching you can find it. SGnerf at his website compares Nerf motors with this exact motor
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#7 Daniel Beaver

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:29 PM

Is it this one?
Posted Image
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#8 hamoidar

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 02:24 PM

Is it this one?
Posted Image

I don't think so, mainly because the Taimya plasma dash motors are brushless, and that motor isn't. Here is the one I belive he is talking about:
Posted Image

Edited by hamoidar, 18 October 2012 - 02:25 PM.

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#9 Daniel Beaver

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 03:32 PM

Is there a way to tell if a motor is brushless from the picture alone?
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#10 Curly

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 05:13 PM

This interests me. Hamoidar has the right picture. Like said above brushless motors need some kind of controller. Hobby shops that carry motors will probably have them. I don't think Plasma dash motors have integrated controllers. Plasma dash motors would definitely work better, but it might take a bit of play to optimize them.

I notice Tamyia has Rev and Torque tuned motors available. I'd think for our uses Torque would be important to keep the motors at full speed. I would think that a larger size such as the 1"(?) motors found in electric spring blasters or Airsoft Guns would provide more torque. Airsoft motors are pretty expensive when you need to buy two motors, a battery, charger, and wire set. However, generic 1"(?) motors are fairly cheap and might be able to provide enough Torque and RPMs.

I'd be very interested to know if anybody has experimented with brushless motors or larger ones in a blaster. I think small brushed motors can't really take the current to get them shooting as far as we'd like.
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#11 hamoidar

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 09:18 PM

Is there a way to tell if a motor is brushless from the picture alone?

Well, sort of. The motor in the picture you posted is a pretty standard brushed design. Brushed motors typically have a flattish plastic end cap with leads on either side or the top of the motor.
While brushless motors either have a different end-cap which is thinner because of the absence of brushes(such as the one above), or, the shell of the motor, which has a permanent magnet ring inside, rotates around the stator coil. The second type is typically used in hobby helicopters and other hobby flying devices. Note: I'm not sure if it's called a stator coil in brushless motors, please correct me if I'm wrong.
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#12 Crater

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Posted 20 October 2012 - 01:19 AM

While brushless motors either have a different end-cap which is thinner because of the absence of brushes(such as the one above), or, the shell of the motor, which has a permanent magnet ring inside, rotates around the stator coil. The second type is typically used in hobby helicopters and other hobby flying devices. Note: I'm not sure if it's called a stator coil in brushless motors, please correct me if I'm wrong.

I'm not an expert, but I'd also call it a stator coil(s). Motors in which the outer shell rotates with the shaft (the second type you mentioned) are known as outrunners, while motors in which the entire rotor is inside the stator are called inrunners. IIRC, outrunners are popular in RC aircraft because they produce more torque than inrunners, so they don't need to be geared down. They're harder to mount, though, because only the rear end is stationary, which is likely to be more of a problem for Nerf applications than it is for aircraft.
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#13 Super0dp

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Posted 20 October 2012 - 10:00 AM

Hamoidar has the right motor. Its the small black Tamyia plasma dash motor. For the mod I soldered the wires directly to the leads on the motor. They work really well and last a long time. Even with a voltage mod they will last and keep performing well. After several wars, battery changes and re-soldering they still work in my modified barricade.
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