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How to properly cut brass for an angel breech.


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#1 mrdarkmonkey96

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 09:54 PM

So, my first angel breech, a earlier this year, I cut everything with a dremel. I cut all of the peices to length, and all of the lips with a dremel. When I was finshed, I cursed the sloppiness. Consequently, this time I chose to use pipe cutters. Im cutting and going, hmm, nice clean cuts. then I try to fit things together......Yeah right.. :angry: . I tried to put the 19/32 and the 9/16 together, and there's a lip making the sliding rather difficult. Sanding that lip helped, but I was never able to regain the smootheness of the original uncut brass. How do you cut your brass?? Best answer( albiet that it actually works) wins bragging rights.

#2 Smokin Joe

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 10:18 PM

Glad you posted this. I was going to begin cutting my brass with pipe cutters tomorrow.
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#3 Collective

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 10:21 PM

When using pipe cutters on brass you have to go really slow and increase the pressure of the cutting wheel little by little to avoid getting that lip you're talking about. It usually takes me a few dozen rotations to get a nice clean cut.
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#4 Phree Agent

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 10:44 PM

Collective has it right. You have to let the wheel do the CUTTING, not the force you exert on it by the turn dial. You just have to go slow.


EDIT: There is also usually a right angle pointy piece on the pipe cutters. This is to de-burr the fresh cut. I have also used this piece to re-expand the possibly deformed pipe edge.

Edited by Phree Agent, 07 March 2012 - 11:30 PM.

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#5 mrdarkmonkey96

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 11:19 PM

When using pipe cutters on brass you have to go really slow and increase the pressure of the cutting wheel little by little to avoid getting that lip you're talking about. It usually takes me a few dozen rotations to get a nice clean cut.


I tried this and it still left a lip. and I only turned the tightener a fraction of a turn each time.
And if I didnt start it tight enough on the brass, it would slide around, which then leaves a ton of tightening rings.....not good

#6 OneWingedAngel

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 11:39 PM

Most pipe cutters have a triangular piece that folds out, this is to ream out the lip that cutting will invariably leave. If yours doesn't, improvise.
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#7 mrdarkmonkey96

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 11:47 PM

Most pipe cutters have a triangular piece that folds out, this is to ream out the lip that cutting will invariably leave. If yours doesn't, improvise.

Could you possibly put a picture?? I'm way stupid, I mean confused.

Edited by mrdarkmonkey96, 07 March 2012 - 11:48 PM.


#8 OneWingedAngel

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 12:43 AM

I don't really know what else there is to say. Take this cutter for example:
Posted Image
See the triangular bit at the 3 o'clock position, that folds out and is used to ream the tube back out. If yours doesn't have that, any suitable wedge shaped thing will work, needle nose pliers, wire cutters, etc.

Edited by OneWingedAngel, 08 March 2012 - 12:45 AM.

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#9 SwiFTNerF

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 12:44 AM

When cutting brass, insert a smaller sized piece of brass into the one your are cutting (19/32nds insert 9/16ths, 9/16ths insert 17/32nds, 17/32nds insert 1/2). Then use your pipe cutters and go slowly. If you do it correctly and carefully, the ends of your cuts will have a very slight lip. Last just use any dremel bit the sand the inside of the barrel lip a little bit. I use this dremel bit but you can use anything the looks like it.

Edited by SwiFTNerF, 08 March 2012 - 12:45 AM.

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#10 Zorns Lemma

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 02:33 AM

I did all my breeches Dremel only. It leads to better fitting and sealing breeches. Use the right cutting disk, choose a low RPM, and go slowly.

What I'm saying is you need be be more pro, tent camper scrub.
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#11 Hammy

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 05:09 AM

Hen hen, just behind my desk at the office, there is a machine room with a milling machine.
So I cut all my brass using that.
After milling the brass, then a piece of emery cloth to remove all the burrs and hey presto.

So far, I have not tried cutting brass with my Dremel yet.
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#12 mrdarkmonkey96

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 08:31 AM

Hen hen, just behind my desk at the office, there is a machine room with a milling machine.
So I cut all my brass using that.
After milling the brass, then a piece of emery cloth to remove all the burrs and hey presto.

So far, I have not tried cutting brass with my Dremel yet.


Cheater...... :P

#13 Hammy

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 09:54 AM

When using the milling machine, the job needs to be securely clamped to the machine, and there is a risk
of distorting (or squashing) the pipe if this is done willy nilly.

My office does not have proper pipe clamps, and instead I put a bolt padded out using masking tape
inside the pipe until the fit is very tight, then apply the clamp where the bolt has beeen inserted.

Then once that is done, the job still takes around 15-20 minutes.
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