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Rainbowpump Writeup

How to make your own

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#1 Ryan201821

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 05:14 PM

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Essential Tools:
-Scrollsaw
-Drill press and power drill
-Belt Sander/Disc Grinder (used exclusively for handles; Disc grinder used to square tubes)
-Dremel w/ cutting wheel
-7/64”, 5/32”, 3/16”, 7/32” drill bits and 3/8”, ½”, 9/16” spade bits
-#6-32 tapping bit
-Scissors and/or file
-Screwdriver
-1/16" Hex driver
-Vise (very helpful)
-Hacksaw
-Computer (obs), printer, and full sheet label paper (templates)
-Duct Tape
-Super Glue
-Safety Glasses
-Leet skillz

Very helpful, not critical:
-Mill
-CNC machine
-Custom tooling plates

Parts List:

Cost and Parts List

Templates

Download Here.

Dimensions:

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The dimensions for the pumpgrip are wrong and the diagram. It should be 2" x 1 3/4" Polyester, which is correct in the parts list.

Fabrication and Assembly:

Print out your templates on label paper, cut them out, and secure them to the various materials. (Trigger not pictured, should be in wood)

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Drill all designated holes with appropriate drill bits. Cut out each piece on the scrollsaw. For the the catch can be done with holesaws, I’ve heard. I've tried it before and found the closest holesaw I could find was a bit too small than I wanted for 1 ¼” PVC. So instead I just cut everything by hand on the scrollsaw. The templates are exact to 1.36” for the circles.

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Assemble the two outside circles for the catch together with ¾” screws. When you’re assembling it, put the catch in between the circles so you can gauge how much room you’ll need to leave for the catch to move up and down freely. You can give it a little bit more room than it needs, and it’ll work perfectly fine. It’s better to go on the larger size than for it to not be able to move. You’ll want the circle with the ½” hole, to be on the back of the screws, and the circle with the 9/16” hole to be closest to the screw heads. Basically, ½” circle guides the plunger rod through the catch, and the 9/16” hole allows you to not have to have both holes perfectly lined up. The first circle has to have a ½” hole otherwise the spring will get caught in between the small gap between the hole and the plunger rod. Another thing that should be noted is most of the time the nylon is a hair larger than ½”. For some reason I have a few spade bits that measure up to .510” and seem to be perfect for this application. So this is something you might have to play with a bit.

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Next you’ll have to make the hole where the screw attaches to the bottom of the catch. Easiest way to do this part is to have a small vise. They usually are included with a decent drill press. Position the catch in the vise as straight as possible so the screw is perpendicular to the top of the notch. Drill it with a 7/64” drill bit and tap.

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Now you’ll need to drill your holes for your plunger tube. The distances for the holes are marked on the dimensions sheet, but here is the order of holes you’ll need to make. On the bottom, the first two holes used to attach the handle, are 7/64” and tapped. The next hole is 5/32” which will be where the screw passes through that connects to the catch. The next two holes after than are also 7/64” and tapped, and also for the handle connection. On the top of the plunger tube, you need to drill four 3/8” holes in each spot where there is a 7/64” hole on the bottom. You’ll need these holes to pass the screwdriver through the plunger tube to connect the handle from above.

Now, take your Rainbow catch assembly, and shove it into the correct spot. You’ll have to align the outer frame of the catch assembly with the 5/32” hole in the plunger tube, for the catch. It’s hard to explain, but you want to make sure the catch assembly isn’t cocked to the side when you secure it in.

At this time you’ll want to make your catch spring. Take a ¾” screw, put on a washer, then your catch spring, with another washer behind that. Screw it into the bottom of the catch until the bottom of the screw meets the bottom of the catch, but does not exceed that point. You don’t want that screw rubbing on your plunger rod. You’ll have to play with the length a bit but it should be short enough to it doesn’t interfere with the travel of the catch. Before this you should have also ran a piece of your ½” nylon through the catch assembly to make sure there isn’t any unnecessary friction.

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Now tighten the screw attached to the catch until it doesn’t move anymore. This should keep the catch assembly in the plunger tube so it doesn’t move. Now you’ll have to drill your holes to secure it. Ideally it would be much easier to use a thicker material for the spring rest. ¼” is the absolute minimum you can screw and tap into the side of. Drill as deep as you can into the spring rest to fit the set screws. You’ll want four holes. Now you’ll have to take the catch assembly back out, then deburr, and tap both the catch assembly and the plunger tube. It’s easier to do them separately.

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After you re-insert the catch assembly, add a 3/8” set screw in each hole. Put your catch spring back in and make sure your catch works. After you’ve done that, take it back out.

Put in your internal coupler, cut to the dimensions it needs to be. You’ll have to cut down the 2” end just a bit to allow it butt up against the catch assembly. When you’re cutting the internal coupler, take a ½” regular coupler, and see which side it fits tight in. For some reason, one side is much larger than the other and one side always fits ½” couplers. Make sure you’re cutting off the tighter section, so you can use it later for the bushing.

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After you have the internal coupler in your plunger tube, drill out the 3/8” and 7/64” holes in the internal coupler.

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Now it’s time to do your handle. I use a belt sander to carve down that big block that’s posted for the template. If you don’t have a belt sander, you’ll have to think of something else that will probably involve a lot of manual labor.

I also sanded down the polycarbonate pieces so my hand (or other people’s) don’t get diddled by sharp edges. Keep the template on your smaller wood piece. You’ll need it. Also the trigger is again not pictured. I sanded down the edges of the trigger, as well.

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Mark on the block of wood in the center of the piece where the line in coming down. This will be one of the anchor points for the handle. Drill that with a 7/64” bit, and then assemble the rest of the handle together with ¾” screws in each of the holes.

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Now it’s time for the worst part, fabricating the pump grip. Cut out the 2” polyester according to the dimensions sheet. The gap in the middle is where you’ll need to cut out your section. It only needs to be wide enough to allow it to pass over the handle. For this part the only tool you can really use is a Dremel. Eventually I’ll be doing these on the mill, but you’ll probably be doing this with a Dremel. You’ll also need to cut a section out from the front that will allow the pump grip to extend into the wye. This will only need to be about an inch long.

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Next you’ll want to take your pump grip and slide it over your plunger tube. Center the slot in the pump grip with the holes for the handle so you pump grip will be aligned with the handle. Make sure the back of the pump grip is past where the handle will be. Now you’ll have to mark where the four 3/8” holes are for the handle. Drill these out with a 3/8” bit as well. You’ll need these access holes because the pump grip needs to be on the blaster before the handle is attached.

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End of picture limit, do not post. This will be three total posts.

Edited by Ryan201821, 16 August 2011 - 03:03 PM.

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#2 Ryan201821

Ryan201821

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 05:16 PM

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Now you’ll be able to secure the handle finally. Before you do that, make sure you have the catch spring assembled after you’ve put on the pump grip. Line up all the clearance holes for the screwdriver and put one ¾” screw in the hole closest to the front of the blaster. This should be the hole you previously drilled in the smaller piece of wood. Now that it’s somewhat secured, align the rest of the blaster with the handle. Drill another hole into the handle through the plunger tube. You’ll need either a longer 7/64” bit, or just chuck all the way down on the very end of the bit. Put another ¾” screw in. It should now be secured and not be able to move, at least temporarily. Drill the other two holes into the handle and put a screw in each one.

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Now it’s time to make your plunger rod. Cut your nylon to length. First you’ll have to do your plunger head. I usually do this first because you’ll need to hammer on the plunger rod a bit to get the components together. If you cut the catch notch and drill the holes before that, you could compromise the integrity of the plunger rod. First you’ll need to cut a 1” long section of ½” x 5/8”, and 5/8” 7/8” polyester tubing. Glue and hammer together. Now you’ll need to hammer this piece onto the plunger rod itself.

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Now cut two sections of 1” x 7/8” polyester about 5/16” long. Glue one of these on each side of the skirt to hold it in. You might want to do this step after you’ve cut the catch notch and drilled the holes. The hole that’s ½” from the back should be 7/32” and come in from the top. This is for the string stop. The 3/16" hole that goes through the side, 1 ¼” from the back, is for the metal rod that connects to the plunger rod. You’ll want to pass the drill bit in this hole several times. When you put in the 3/16” steel rod, the fit will be pretty tight. Make the hole a bit bigger until you can push in the metal rod but won’t be able to move freely back and forth.

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Now for a part that you’ll have trouble on, the slots. We have a mill and special tooling plates to do these. The easiest way to do these if you don’t have a mill, is to use the scrollsaw. Drill two 3/8” holes through both sides, using the measurements provided. Feed the blade through the holes and cut from hole to hole. They won’t come out as nearly straight, but they really don’t need to be perfect.

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After you’ve made the slots, put that piece on the rest of the blaster. If you aligned the catch properly, all you should have to do is line up the slots with the two screws holding the catch assembly together. Drill and tap a 7/64” hole through the slot piece and the internal coupler. Depending on where you put your holes in the pump grip, you might have push the pump grip back a bit to get to the hole. Use a 3/8” long set screw to hold it together.

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At this point you can now do the bushing/wye assembly. Use the small piece of the internal coupler you cut off earlier and hammer a ½” coupler inside. Trim the coupler until it’s flush with the internal coupler piece. After that, add a piece of ½” PVC to the bushing assembly and attach a ½” wye on the other side. You can optionally add a screw to the wye so it doesn’t move around. Use a ½” screw.

It should look something like this after you’re done.

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Now you’ll need to add the sheath and string stop. First you’ll need to take off the slotted piece. Cut out a 2” piece of steel rod and file down the ends so it won’t scratch up the sheath. You’ll also need to cut out a 9 ½” piece of 2” PVC.

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Drill two 7/32” holes on each end of the 1 ¼” PVC Tee. This will be for the string stop.

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Add a couple layers of duct tape to the outside of the 1 ¼” tee to make the outside of the tee fit the inside of the sheath. Now here comes the fun part. Get out your string, and add a knot to one end. Feed the other end through the first hole in the tee. Keep feeding that end now through the 2” PVC. At this point you can push your 1 ¼” inside the 2” sheath.

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Feed the string through the slotted 1 ¼” piece and then through the back hole in the plunger rod. Feed the string back through the slotted piece, and then back through the 2” PVC. Now feed the string through the other hole in the tee.

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Now slip the 1 ¼” slotted piece back onto the blaster, and add the 2” piece of steel rod through the plunger rod.

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End of picture limit, do not post. This will be three total posts.

Edited by Ryan201821, 15 April 2011 - 01:53 PM.

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#3 Ryan201821

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 05:17 PM

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Now add the set screw back to hold in the 1 ¼” slotted piece. Again you’ll probably have to push the pump grip back a bit to get the screw in. At this step I’ll usually prime the blaster.

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While the blaster is still primed, you’ll need to adjust your string stop. It might take a couple times to get it perfect, but you’ll want to choke up on the plunger rod as much as possible, without it hitting front bushing, or having the steel rod slam into pump grip/slotted piece.

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Cut the string down and add tape so the string ends aren’t flapping around. Now you’ll need to drill a 7/64” hole and tap it through the 2” sheath, 1 ¼” tee, and 1 ¼” slotted piece. This will secure everything together.

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And you’re done!

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Okay, now you can post.

Edited by Ryan201821, 06 June 2012 - 02:50 PM.

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#4 Ryan201821

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 01:52 PM

Woo, my writeup is back up. Parts list and cost sheet has been added, finally.
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#5 cheerios

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 03:06 PM

As always very nice Ryan, these things are really nice and everyone should make one of these.
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22:46- jakejagan :Ryan, did you hear that Zeke's BBBB made N9 bleed?
22:47- Zorn :BONUS

#6 Nate45

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 08:59 AM

So if you want to make one you have to buy the parts for at least 3-4?
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#7 Ryan201821

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 01:37 PM

So if you want to make one you have to buy the parts for at least 3-4?

Not quite. You will need to purchase a lot of extra materials because of the minimum orders McMaster has for some of their products. The parts list shows what you need to order to build one blaster. You'll need to order extra stuff if you want to build more than one.
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#8 Ice Nine

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 01:42 PM

God, Ryan, will you ever build anything that doesn't put dicks in its mouth?

This gun would be better if you had to pump it many more times to fire it once.

Edited by Ice Nine, 18 April 2011 - 01:43 PM.

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Unholy Three: DUPLUM SCRTA, DUPLUM PROBLEMA (2009)

But Zeke guns tend to be like proofs by contradiction

Theoretically solid but actually non-constructive

Rnbw Cln


#9 shardbearer

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 02:32 PM

Would it be possible to, with a few changes, put a pair of bow arms on one of these, puting the string through the stock, and take out the spring? Cause that would be a mad compact RainbowPAC. Too bad about the face/arm diddle though.
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#10 Daniel Beaver

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 09:29 PM

Would it be possible to, with a few changes, put a pair of bow arms on one of these, puting the string through the stock, and take out the spring? Cause that would be a mad compact RainbowPAC. Too bad about the face/arm diddle though.


I futzed a bit with this concept, and I don't think it is practical to do it in a way that doesn't interfere with your arms. Think about where your body parts are going to be when you prime the blaster. Vertical bow arms might work, though.

And in any case, bow arms make blasters HUGE, so I think it is a bit silly to try to make "compact" bow-powered blasters.

Edited by Daniel Beaver, 23 April 2011 - 09:30 PM.

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#11 shardbearer

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 11:45 PM

Yeah, bow arms need to get smaller before its really any use shrinking the rest of the blaster. I did experiment a bit with 2' 1/4" fiberglass bow arms, but Im too scared of them snapping and shards going everywhere to get any decent draw length.
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