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Breathing Plastic Dust/fumes


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#1 autonerf

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 10:23 PM

I got this sand paper the other day and there was print that read wear a mask and gloves when sanding. So what will happen if I breathe in too much plastic dust and microscopic plastic shavings get in my skin? Is there harm in breathing the fumes of melting plastic? I would like to know before I get cancer or something.
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#2 Mxer4life369

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 10:25 PM

Not to be an ass or anything, but this should be either off topic or general nerf. Not Modifications

And I never wear a mask when I sand, so I guess its fine. The only time I've ever even been careful when sanding was sharpening/balancing R/C boat props, which are made of berylium(sp?) copper, which is toxic as hell.

Edited by Mxer4life369, 29 August 2008 - 10:28 PM.

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#3 Split

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 10:31 PM

He's right. But to answer your questions, the most pertinent thing is lead poisoning. Some paints contain lead and when sanded release it into the air and can hurt you significantly. Hence multi-billion dollar recalls on children's toys with lead in the paint. Kid licks it, kid dies.

Other possible things include lung cancer from chemicals mutating cells and what not. You could also get high off of aerosol products and jump off a building. Sometimes warnings are there for good reason. Generally you can just follow them blindly. Or put this in off-topic.
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#4 nerfboi

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 10:33 PM

I'm taking a guess and saying that dust will just irritate your breathing. But the worst can happen is it will collect up and you will be breathing hard? For painting, I HIGHLY hugest one of those high grade respirators. I painted something for my bike ones and only use one of those dust masks and I had a hard time breathing for a week.
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#5 Bullshit Dragon

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 10:36 PM

Safety would be common sense if you asked me...

Advice:
Safety Glasses/Face Shield
Lots of Ventilation
Watch your Fingers

I do all my sanding outside because it makes a huge mess. It's important to have eye protection while you're sanding/cutting/grinding. You can replace your lungs and some of your other organs, but eyesight is irreplaceable.
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#6 Mxer4life369

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 10:36 PM

When I paint, I go outside.
People who paint guns inside are what I consider dumb. (no offense anyone).
Outside, you don't even need a mask or anything.
Also, my mom would kill me if I painted inside.
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#7 notthedinkus

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 10:37 PM

Unless I'm working outside I almost allways wear a dust mask for cutting PVC pipe, or even brass, because dust goes everywhere. I also wear goggles because if you've ever gotten that stuff in your eyes, you'd know that it hurts and its even worse to get out.
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#8 thedap

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 02:17 PM

plastic dust is like any fine particulate, in your lungs it will cause irritation and can damage things.
same with the eyes. the harder plastics can make a very abrasive dust, it can easily scratch your eyes and skin if rubbed.
always wash starting with cold water, hot water will open the pores of your skin and can trap really fine dirt and dust. that makes for zits in all kinds of wierd spots. finish up with the warmer water if you feel the need.

common sense applies, don't sand 2 inches from your face! work outside if possible. use any wind to your advantage, or use a fan to help. a simple dust mask and safety glasses are dirt cheap. the dollar stores sell them usually.

hand sanding isn't all that bad, it's power sanding and grinding that throw crap everywhere.

be aware of the rotation on power tools, so they throw bits AWAY from your face instead of INTO it.

BTW, beryllium has been linked to the disease sarcoidosis, Bernie Mac had it and he died from complications because of it.

melting plastic can be VERY bad for you. too hot and it's going to outgas. a dust mask wont protect from gasses like clorine. burning plastics is bad no matter how you do it. burning makes soot, releases gasses and generally stinks up the place. nobody will be happy with you.

good luck and stay safe.
now go shoot pieces of plastic at your friends ;)
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#9 Split

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 02:37 PM

Please use capitalization, grammar and proper spelling. And don't use short hand notation. It seems like a helpful post but it gets hard to comprehend things like "too hot and its going to outgas."
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#10 CaptainSlug

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 03:16 PM

Is there harm in breathing the fumes of melting plastic?

Well if any of the tools you are using are leading to the plastic melting then you're not using the right tools for the work you are doing. Plastic is VERY easy to cut, provided you are using blades with the right tooth count and only using lower grit count sanding bits at moderate speeds.
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#11 baghead

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 03:32 PM

I tend to work wearing one of these when I really am worried about fumes Be it Painting, cutting plastic, or shaping plastic with me heat gun:

Posted Image

Half-mask Respirators for the win.

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#12 Watari

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 11:07 PM

Safety would be common sense if you asked me...

Advice:
Safety Glasses/Face Shield
Lots of Ventilation
Watch your Fingers

I do all my sanding outside because it makes a huge mess. It's important to have eye protection while you're sanding/cutting/grinding. You can replace your lungs and some of your other organs, but eyesight is irreplaceable.

To bad (as Badger said) common sense isn't really that common...On topic:
I have safety glasses and some gloves, and good ventilation (I modify with the garage open, but i'm in the back of the garage, in front of the cars, and sometimes with a fan). Mostly all of the time, I don't use the glasses or the gloves (because i'm mentally retarded) so yesterday, I cut my fingers... and whenever I use something out of a spray can (like silicone lubricant or spray paint) I always do it near the exit of the garage. But here's my question:

1.) Can breathing the fumes coming from that hot-glue do anything at all to you?
2.) Can licking the hot glue (to cool it down faster, I don't do this anymore because I use a small cup thingy of water to cool things down now) do anything at all to you?
3.) Can cutting brass with a pipe cutter (the ones that you twist the pipe instead of use force) do anything because when I start cutting, it starts to smell funny, yet I don't feel any "symptoms," maybe it's just the metal scratching against metal that's making that smell...
4.) Can melted plastic do anything (honestly, I'm just asking this because even though I don't have anything that can melt plastic, other than a lighter, e.g. dremel at the highest setting with sanding bit) to your lungs?

Because if any of those can, i'm pretty much going to be really messed up in the future because I do breathe fumes from the hot glue gun (because I don't constantly/frequently turn it off/on alot, usually I just leave it on). Or (now I don't) "used to" lick the hot glue, and sometimes, when it just happens, maybe because of the wind or something, the fumes from those aerosol (spelling?) cans get into my lungs.
Oh, and I don't really breathe in the plastic dust because usually plastic from PCV pipe is too thick, coarse, whatever the word is... to breathe in.

Edited by Watari, 30 August 2008 - 11:07 PM.

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#13 Aimless

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 07:08 AM

To bad (as Badger said) common sense isn't really that common...On topic:
I have safety glasses and some gloves, and good ventilation (I modify with the garage open, but i'm in the back of the garage, in front of the cars, and sometimes with a fan). Mostly all of the time, I don't use the glasses or the gloves (because i'm mentally retarded) so yesterday, I cut my fingers... and whenever I use something out of a spray can (like silicone lubricant or spray paint) I always do it near the exit of the garage. But here's my question:

1.) Can breathing the fumes coming from that hot-glue do anything at all to you?
2.) Can licking the hot glue (to cool it down faster, I don't do this anymore because I use a small cup thingy of water to cool things down now) do anything at all to you?
3.) Can cutting brass with a pipe cutter (the ones that you twist the pipe instead of use force) do anything because when I start cutting, it starts to smell funny, yet I don't feel any "symptoms," maybe it's just the metal scratching against metal that's making that smell...
4.) Can melted plastic do anything (honestly, I'm just asking this because even though I don't have anything that can melt plastic, other than a lighter, e.g. dremel at the highest setting with sanding bit) to your lungs?

Because if any of those can, i'm pretty much going to be really messed up in the future because I do breathe fumes from the hot glue gun (because I don't constantly/frequently turn it off/on alot, usually I just leave it on). Or (now I don't) "used to" lick the hot glue, and sometimes, when it just happens, maybe because of the wind or something, the fumes from those aerosol (spelling?) cans get into my lungs.
Oh, and I don't really breathe in the plastic dust because usually plastic from PCV pipe is too thick, coarse, whatever the word is... to breathe in.


Unless you're constantly breathing those things in for LONG periods of time, you shouldn't have a problem.
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#14 CaptainSlug

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 11:31 AM

1.) Can breathing the fumes coming from that hot-glue do anything at all to you?
2.) Can licking the hot glue (to cool it down faster, I don't do this anymore because I use a small cup thingy of water to cool things down now) do anything at all to you?
3.) Can cutting brass with a pipe cutter (the ones that you twist the pipe instead of use force) do anything because when I start cutting, it starts to smell funny, yet I don't feel any "symptoms," maybe it's just the metal scratching against metal that's making that smell...
4.) Can melted plastic do anything (honestly, I'm just asking this because even though I don't have anything that can melt plastic, other than a lighter, e.g. dremel at the highest setting with sanding bit) to your lungs?

1. No
2. No
3. No
4. Fumes, Yes. Dust, not really.
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