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somebody made a topic asking about it, but it went away.

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#26 g-force

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 01:14 PM

well, If you are backpacking instead of bringing a water filter you could bring iodine tablets to save space and wieght.

I read in field and stream that there are special uv lights that can purify water very very well and easily. I found the price tag a little steep though.

Edited by g-force, 27 June 2008 - 01:14 PM.

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QUOTE(Carbon @ Jul 28 2008, 03:25 AM) View Post

My god, you actually built it. To that, all I can say is, "bravo".

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#27 pwnchu

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Posted 27 June 2008 - 11:04 PM

As you said - that depends on what you're doing. For car camping, just bring several large jugs of clean water with you - less hassle.

Yeah, I forgot to say about the car camping situation. Clean water is preferable to collected water that you don't know where it's been. Not to mention if you can't find the body of water that was *supposed* to be there, then you are screwed.

I remember once my troop used the filters in this lake. The water we got was still somewhat green, but we used it to cook noodles. Didn't taste weird, no one got sick. Random eh?

With a good water filter made for backpacking, you don't need to boil the water. Usually it comes with some sanitizer you can put in the water to remove anything viral, and the filter will remove most bacteria, which is primarily what you're worried about. If you're going to boil the water, you can usually just tie a bandanna around the bottle opening to filter out all of the particles. Boiling the water will kill anything that's in it, so the only reason to filter it is to remove larger particles. Also, if you're using water from streams, lakes, etc. don't forget that no amount of filtering or boiling will remove chemicals.

Huh. I seem to have remembered my Philmont trip (New Mexico backpacking) incorrectly. I think they only said we had to do both filtering and boiling for this one really dirty river.



well, If you are backpacking instead of bringing a water filter you could bring iodine tablets to save space and wieght.

Iodine cleaned water taste terrible IMO. Filters are not that heavy or bulky, and for long trips you may run out of Iodine. Also, the iodine process takes much longer.

I read in field and stream that there are special uv lights that can purify water very very well and easily. I found the price tag a little steep though.


I think I've heard bad things about those, not sure. I would rather take the filter because they can remove particles.

Another advantage of boiling is that you need hot water/stoves to clean things anyways (ie sterilization and dishwashing). Copper bottomed pots/pans are excellent for fast heating.

Now that I'm mentioning cooking utensils, has anyone used those folding plastic bowls? They're very good for backpacking.

Edited by pwnchu, 27 June 2008 - 11:05 PM.

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#28 Ubermensch

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Posted 28 June 2008 - 07:38 AM

I have a small pot that I can hang from my bag and it's great for cooking and eating. Normally, I just carve spoons and forks out of wood. Those collapsible bowls are hard to wash, in my opinion.
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#29 g-force

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Posted 28 June 2008 - 11:30 PM

I read in field and stream that there are special uv lights that can purify water very very well and easily. I found the price tag a little steep though.


I think I've heard bad things about those, not sure. I would rather take the filter because they can remove particles.

Another advantage of boiling is that you need hot water/stoves to clean things anyways (ie sterilization and dishwashing). Copper bottomed pots/pans are excellent for fast heating.

Now that I'm mentioning cooking utensils, has anyone used those folding plastic bowls? They're very good for backpacking.

The uv light can kill all bactieria and/or viruses or other uh ohs you may have in your water (Except bigger things like crap bugs, etc but it can clean up the bacteria left behind by the bug or crap.)
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QUOTE(Carbon @ Jul 28 2008, 03:25 AM) View Post

My god, you actually built it. To that, all I can say is, "bravo".

Chubbs

#30 pwnchu

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Posted 29 June 2008 - 12:01 AM

(old quoted stuff)

The uv light can kill all bactieria and/or viruses or other uh ohs you may have in your water (Except bigger things like crap bugs, etc but it can clean up the bacteria left behind by the bug or crap.)


Right, but what I'm saying is that boiling does the same, but without the need of extra equipment, because you need a stove anyways. And the UV light can't clean things besides water, while you can use boiling water to clean other things.
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#31 g-force

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Posted 29 June 2008 - 10:49 AM

(old quoted stuff)

The uv light can kill all bactieria and/or viruses or other uh ohs you may have in your water (Except bigger things like crap bugs, etc but it can clean up the bacteria left behind by the bug or crap.)


Right, but what I'm saying is that boiling does the same, but without the need of extra equipment, because you need a stove anyways. And the UV light can't clean things besides water, while you can use boiling water to clean other things.

that is a good point but in some parks or forests you cant start a fire and the uv light is much lighter and faster to use.
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QUOTE(Carbon @ Jul 28 2008, 03:25 AM) View Post

My god, you actually built it. To that, all I can say is, "bravo".

Chubbs

#32 pwnchu

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Posted 29 June 2008 - 09:33 PM

Stoves and open fires are not the same, and I doubt there's many places where you can't have a stove, as that would mean only cold food, which is pretty lame.
And as I said before, there are small copper bottomed pans that can output a decent amount of water quickly, while both white gas stoves and water filters are exceptionally compact.

Basically what I'm saying is that white gas stoves and UV cleaners are about the same, except that you can use white gas stoves for more things.


Has anyone tried "ranger pudding"? It's where you take the top off of a packet of hot chocolate, pour a bit of water into it, and eat it. I totally hate it, but they showed it to us during Philmont.

How about human sumping? Essentially, you dishwash without soap, and you drink the water when you're done. The alternative during Philmont was putting the stuff in the "yummy bag", which is a bag of organic waste that accumulates over the whole 10 days (you can't throw it away, according to some sadistic rule). Not a pretty smell or sight.

Edited by pwnchu, 29 June 2008 - 09:34 PM.

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#33 Ambience 327

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Posted 30 June 2008 - 07:41 AM

I don't bother with "ranger pudding", I just eat the hot cocoa straight and dry, then wash it down with some cool water and settle back with a smile on my face. :D
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#34 Crankymonky

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Posted 01 July 2008 - 01:35 PM

Hmm, I'll assume you mean car camping, or similar.

As a backpacker and former employee in a camping store...

1) Map (Not a gps, silly)
2) Compass (And please, know how to use it BEFORE you go out)
3) Sunglasses / Sunscreen normally make the list, depending on where you backpack, extra weight.
4) Extra food and water(something you don't need to cook, boil, etc.)
5) Extra clothes (Make sure you have quick drying clothing, but an extra set is not a waste of space, it will rain, or you will forget to wear your gaiters)
6) Flashlight of some sort
7) First Aid kit
8) Pocket Knife
9) Fire Starter
10) Matches, water-proof, in water-tight case

And...despite not being on the "10 essentials" --But because I say drop sunglasses, this makes it 10.

A way to purify water. I always have my filter -- and carrying a little bit of iodine or chlorine is always good.
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