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#1 masterchief117

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 12:09 PM

so i'm hoping to run a war in our fields (we live in the countryside tho) but i am thirteen so it will be hard but i might have someone who can co host with me so i have parking and a small field to play in (i need to build cover) but i need tips for it i already know the fps will be 200. also can some explane to me what is the difrence between superstock and that stuff. thanks:D


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#2 meishel

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Posted 17 July 2018 - 09:07 PM

I really like the portable changing tents for cover.  We bought a bunch of them for $20 a piece a while back.  Seems like the price went up for summer: https://jet.com/prod...72-3249d6af173f
Being out in the country will complicate things.  Have you already tried seeing if there's a group near you that you could get a ride to?


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#3 masterchief117

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Posted 25 July 2018 - 12:47 PM

ya theirs one about 15 minutes away we always go to that why i want to :)


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#4 Meaker VI

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Posted 26 July 2018 - 03:58 PM

so i'm hoping to run a war in our fields (we live in the countryside tho) but i am thirteen so it will be hard but i might have someone who can co host with me so i have parking and a small field to play in (i need to build cover) but i need tips for it i already know the fps will be 200. also can some explane to me what is the difrence between superstock and that stuff. thanks:D

 

 

FPS limits should be determined by how well protected your players are/are willing to be, what ranges you'll be playing at, what level of cover you have, how many players/what ROF you have, and the liklihood of pedestrians messing up your arena.

 

If your players are wearing more protection, they can withstand higher FPS without serious injury. Really, even at stock velocities (75ish FPS) eye protection should be required for all participants; but apparently people playing HvZ (130ish FPS) are lunatics and usually don't wear it, and I have the hardest time getting neighborhood kids (100ish FPS) to wear it consistently - in both cases I've only heard rare reports of someone taking an actually damaging hit to the eye. Up to 150-200 can work with just eye protection, but much higher than 150 you may want face/hand protection depending on your constitution and the ranges involved.

 

Then, with longer ranges, you can have a higher FPS limit as fewer shots will land and those that do will have lost much of their velocity. Closer ranges have the opposite effect. Max direct-fire range for most blasters is ~120' or so, but I'd consider a long-range field to be one where all shots are likely to be taken from pretty extreme distances (50'+). A football field might be a long-range field, where a back yard might be a mid-range field. Indoors is generally close range, though I play in a church I'd consider mid-long range.

 

Higher cover also reduces the chances of a hit landing, so higher FPS could work in higher cover than lower. Be careful that it doesn't also encourage diminished engagement distance or it'll go the other way.

 

Higher ROF/more players (same effect) means more shots will be flying at whatever FPS you set. Consider that, weigh it against the range you expect, limit FPS appropriately. Nobody likes being lit up with 200+ FPS shots at point blank from a dozen directions.

 

Bystanders and pedestrians can ruin everything. For decades, NIC-class (High/unlimited FPS; frequently 200-400) wars have been played in public parks, so pausing play is feasible, but you'll need to discipline your players to do it. HvZ generally doesn't have the luxury/possibility of pausing and also has tremendous bystander pressure, so they must have lower FPS rules (130-150 typically). If you're in a super-bystandery place, you may need to run stock-only. The consideration is how likely is it that some rando in your field will get hit by a stray dart? A higher FPS cap makes it more likely as the darts have more reach, but if ROF is low, cover high, and the bystanders unlikely to be in line with valid targets, higher FPS can still work.

 

'Superstock' means 'stock blasters that are modded', usually also allows modified/non-stock darts but with the rise of good China darts that portion has been lost to time. A better rule is to just say what FPS you want with what margin of error and what test (eg: 200 FPS average over 10 shots with accustrike/fake darts). If you don't have a chrono and can't do FPS tests, you can try a few other options (pain test on a specific designated tester, ballistic pendilum where you shoot a dart at a weight and see how much it moves; 'dent-test' on cardboard, sand, foam, etc. measured for depth of impact), but you will be best off generalizing or specifying a limit that others can test and then not actually testing onsite.

 

For your 200 FPS limit, you need to require eye protection. If you expect much action at close-ranges I'd recommend face/hand protection. More players means you need more cover, with a couple players an open field can work ok.


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