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Maximum Voltage for an MTB Rhino Motor


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#1 Supercoolman555

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 11:44 AM

What is the maximum amount of voltage an MTB Rhino Motor can take before it burns up?

 

Thanks Guys


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#2 Duke Wintermaul

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 01:29 PM

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#3 NerfGeek416

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 03:52 PM

If you're asking this, you probably don't know how to read that chart anyway. Run your rhinos on a 3S lipo, which is nominally 11.1V, but is actually about 12V. a 12V NiMH pack would also be a good option. 14500 (AA size) IMR cannot supply sufficient current. 18650 size cells should be able to, but Lipo is cheaper and easier.


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#4 Supercoolman555

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 03:57 PM

I know it can run a 3s lipo, but I want to know what the absolute MAXIMUM voltage it can run before burning up.


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#5 Meaker VI

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 04:16 PM

I know it can run a 3s lipo, but I want to know what the absolute MAXIMUM voltage it can run before burning up.

Why? Why would you want to supply more voltage for something designed for maximum efficiency - and performance in our case - at less?


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#6 shandsgator8

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Posted 18 April 2017 - 06:32 PM

I know it can run a 3s lipo, but I want to know what the absolute MAXIMUM voltage it can run before burning up.

 

If you really want an answer, here it is: it depends. You can overvolt them as much as you want as long as you're willing to deal with a much shorter life. But how much of a shorter life is anyone's guess.

 

So then the question is, if you increased the voltage by X volts, how much of a shorter life will you have? But before you can answer that question, you need to know how much of a shorter life you are willing to deal with. 

 

TLDR: Just buy a second set of motors, run your desired voltage and keep track of the run times. If they last long enough for you (assuming nothing melts), you have your answer. If they don't, use less voltage and run them again, keeping track of how long they last. 


Edited by shandsgator8, 18 April 2017 - 06:35 PM.

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