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#1 Maniacal Coyote

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 04:41 PM

I'm trying to come up with a printable Rainbow Catch for 1-1/8" ID polycarbonate tubing, but I need to know something fairly specific. How thick should the actual catch face be? It would be printed at 100% infill, unless there's a stronger pattern than solid plastic. I'd like it to be able to handle 55+ lbs of draw in case one of you is loco enough to use this with a full compression K14.
 
The face will be 3/8" by 3/16", and I'd print it such that the plunger rod would be perpendicular to the planes of the layers.
 
I don't know much about printing, and I haven't yet taken Properties of Materials, so I'm asking people who might know.

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#2 blitz

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Posted 23 January 2017 - 07:54 PM

I would certainly say in excess of 3/8" thickness. I don't really know the mathematics behind this, but just going from experience.

 

I would be concerned about using a [k26], much less a k14. The layers (pierced by screws inside the pvc) will split. 


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#3 Meaker VI

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 12:02 AM

 

I'm trying to come up with a printable Rainbow Catch for 1-1/8" ID polycarbonate tubing, but I need to know something fairly specific. How thick should the actual catch face be? It would be printed at 100% infill, unless there's a stronger pattern than solid plastic. I'd like it to be able to handle 55+ lbs of draw in case one of you is loco enough to use this with a full compression K14.
 
The face will be 3/8" by 3/16", and I'd print it such that the plunger rod would be perpendicular to the planes of the layers.
 
I don't know much about printing, and I haven't yet taken Properties of Materials, so I'm asking people who might know.

 

 

Look at my file in your other thread. I used a 1/4" plate with a chamfer on the back side (for the PR to track through, the bearing side is flat), seems to hold alright but I haven't tested it extensively. I did 20% infill - your edge layers are way more important here and I used 1.6mm IIRC. The piece is in pretty pure shear, which for many materials should be good for at least several hundred pounds.

 

If you did manage to break it, you're also only talking a ~30 minute print and a few grams of material, so it's no big deal to experiment with. And it's not a hard part to machine, so doing it that way is also an option.

 

Though I really recommend just using my file - Attached File  v3 Catch w Guide.stl   3.03MB   57 downloads

The hard parts I took care of for you are that I *absolutely do not* trust printed stuff to hold the spring back in both directions. Bolts are the bearing surfaces holding it in the blaster. It's also ~1.33" OD, you might be able to just shrink it down and still have it work.

Catch.png


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#4 Justin Andrews

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Posted 24 January 2017 - 06:13 AM

I've quite successfully used laser sintered nylon catches. However I also print prototype parts on my own filament printer, so I'd recommend using as high as an infill as you can get away with before your printer starts blobbing (or if it does just turn down your feed rate a touch)

However, if you can, I really recommend buying some time on a nylon laser sintering machine, as the quality and strength of the parts is really good.


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