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Logo detailing?


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#1 apocalypticamerica

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 03:33 AM

Hi, I've been searching for a thread on this, but I can't seem to find much detail on this topic anywhere. I've been eyeing a lot of really good looking paint jobs with nicely detailed logos, and I'm wondering how people get them looking so sharp. I've seen some great guides on painting in general, and some assorted specifics, but nothing about logo/hand detailing in particular. Can anyone point me in the right direction?
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#2 OceanSkais

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 10:18 AM

Hi, I've been searching for a thread on this, but I can't seem to find much detail on this topic anywhere. I've been eyeing a lot of really good looking paint jobs with nicely detailed logos, and I'm wondering how people get them looking so sharp. I've seen some great guides on painting in general, and some assorted specifics, but nothing about logo/hand detailing in particular. Can anyone point me in the right direction?

Its because they use really small brushes and go realitvely slow. The quality or the brush and the paint great effect the outcome aswell.
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#3 apocalypticamerica

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 04:02 PM

Its because they use really small brushes and go realitvely slow. The quality or the brush and the paint great effect the outcome aswell.



Hm. I guess I had assumed as much- so I'm kind of looking for paint/brush recommendations as much as anything else.
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#4 The2ndBluesBro

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Posted 08 October 2015 - 04:05 PM

Testors, Tamiya or Citadel work the best from what I've heard. Ask for a "microbrush" and get a good quality one. You won't have to buy another one for a really long time.
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#5 Vim Fuego

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Posted 18 October 2015 - 11:44 PM

I used a metallic ink marker pen for my Rayven - similar to these, except mine have medium tips for faster coverage...

Even with the big, knobbly tip on them, because the logo is raised up from the surface of the blaster, you can work quite quickly as long as you don't try to press too hard. Try to avoid going over bits you've already done too, especially if they are starting to dry already.

Durability might not be great, but as long as you are going to finish with an overall clear-coat, it should be fine. I used a white one to paint stuff on my rollerblades back in the 90s, and is still hasn't worn off... :D
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#6 Brimstone Omega

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Posted 20 October 2015 - 09:09 PM

What you can do to make the actual painting part a bit easier is try to use the edge of the brush. Know what I mean? Like instead of coming at (giggidy) the part you want to paint head on, as though your brush were a pen or pencil, rather think of it as you are wiping or scraping the paint off of you brush and onto your blaster. Alternatively, though it can be a bit messy if you are unpracticed, you can try dry-brushing the raised lettering or whatever you are looking to paint. Get yourself an old or cheap brush for you will ruin it, and get a bit of paint on the end. Now, scrub the paint off onto a paper towel or rag till it doesn't stain your towel anymore, don't worry, there IS still paint in the bristles. You can always add more on a second pass. Now flick the brush over what you want to paint and presto, watch the paint slowly build over the raised parts of your project.

If you do want a small brush for details, I would recommend not necessarily a hobby brush, but got to like Hobby Lobby or Micheal's and go to the paint brush section and get yourself a White Talkion 18/0 liner brush. Small enough for your purposes but not too outrageous. I use my 18/0 to paint super tiny details in minis and pewter statues so the lettering and logos should be no problem at all.
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