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Question: vinyl letttering for paint stencils?


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#1 ravetrooper

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 03:24 AM

So for the next few days I will have access to a silhouettes cutting machine and some vinyl/other materials. So I have a few questions:
1. Has anyone ever used vinyl letters/cutouts on painted blasters?
2. Can the "negatives" be used as stencils for painting?
2-2 will it stick well enough to create a good, clean edge seal
3. Will the letters destroy the paint underneath?
4. Are there any other better materials for making stencils?
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Gut the electronics, drill a hole in the shell, and attach a crank to the gear. Bam, crank-action stampede that doesn't require batteries, or even a trigger.

...(also judging by your past posts, I would consider you pretty dang wise elder like in the modding community :lol: )


#2 Langley

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 10:16 AM

It's going to depend on the surface of the thing you're painting. You should probably try it out first on something similar or on part of the piece that no one is going to see (inside of a shell for example). I've used vinyl cut on a plotter to etch glass with a chemical etch and it came out really sharp, but that just means the vinyl made a good seal with the smooth glass surface and didn't allow much of the foamy etching compound to get through.

Edit: I don't know anything about the vinyl that was used to make the decal, so I can't tell you what it was, but it didn't leave a residue when I peeled it off, or if it did it got rinsed away with the etching cream.
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#3 ravetrooper

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 12:49 PM

It's going to depend on the surface of the thing you're painting. You should probably try it out first on something similar or on part of the piece that no one is going to see (inside of a shell for example). I've used vinyl cut on a plotter to etch glass with a chemical etch and it came out really sharp, but that just means the vinyl made a good seal with the smooth glass surface and didn't allow much of the foamy etching compound to get through.

Edit: I don't know anything about the vinyl that was used to make the decal, so I can't tell you what it was, but it didn't leave a residue when I peeled it off, or if it did it got rinsed away with the etching cream.


Thanks Langley! I will probably test this out one of my many empty maverick shells...
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Gut the electronics, drill a hole in the shell, and attach a crank to the gear. Bam, crank-action stampede that doesn't require batteries, or even a trigger.

...(also judging by your past posts, I would consider you pretty dang wise elder like in the modding community :lol: )


#4 roboman

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 11:20 PM

One of the great things about self-adhesive vinyl is that you can make it conform to really complex surfaces with a heat gun or even just a hairdryer. Unfortunately, it also really likes to stay stuck to things, so you'll have to be careful when you peel it off to avoid tearing it or pulling up the edges of the paint. The vinyl sheet I've used doesn't really leave a residue on things, but it's also meant for wrapping cars and like I said, sticks really well. Based on a quick Google search, I can see that several companies sell removable vinyl sheet, or "low-tack" vinyl. That's probably more along the lines of what you want.

This is actually something that Baghead and I have discussed for a while, because it would make really awesome paintjobs happen very quickly and we know people with vinyl cutters. I'm really interested to see what you come up with and how it works out for you.

You should look into making some accent decals for different blasters, too. I picked up some neat color-shifting carbon fiber vinyl wrap on eBay a few months back that would look really neat on just about anything (I just bought a few sample rectangles, so I wrapped my mouse with an x-acto knife and a hairdryer).

If you get really thick vinyl, it works really well for etching surfaces with a sandblaster if you've got access to one or feel like picking up a cheap one at Harbor Freight. That looks really awesome on shiny/transparent things. Unfortunately, the vinyl for that is decently expensive compared to normal sign vinyl, but it's several times thicker and designed to be removed from things. Look up "Sandblast resist" - Amazon carries it in a bunch of sizes.
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#5 ravetrooper

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 02:53 PM

Thanks for the advice! I'm going to start working on it today so I'll put some progress pics up soon.
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Gut the electronics, drill a hole in the shell, and attach a crank to the gear. Bam, crank-action stampede that doesn't require batteries, or even a trigger.

...(also judging by your past posts, I would consider you pretty dang wise elder like in the modding community :lol: )


#6 ravetrooper

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 11:34 PM

One of the great things about self-adhesive vinyl is that you can make it conform to really complex surfaces with a heat gun or even just a hairdryer. Unfortunately, it also really likes to stay stuck to things, so you'll have to be careful when you peel it off to avoid tearing it or pulling up the edges of the paint. The vinyl sheet I've used doesn't really leave a residue on things, but it's also meant for wrapping cars and like I said, sticks really well. Based on a quick Google search, I can see that several companies sell removable vinyl sheet, or "low-tack" vinyl. That's probably more along the lines of what you want.

This is actually something that Baghead and I have discussed for a while, because it would make really awesome paintjobs happen very quickly and we know people with vinyl cutters. I'm really interested to see what you come up with and how it works out for you.

You should look into making some accent decals for different blasters, too. I picked up some neat color-shifting carbon fiber vinyl wrap on eBay a few months back that would look really neat on just about anything (I just bought a few sample rectangles, so I wrapped my mouse with an x-acto knife and a hairdryer).

If you get really thick vinyl, it works really well for etching surfaces with a sandblaster if you've got access to one or feel like picking up a cheap one at Harbor Freight. That looks really awesome on shiny/transparent things. Unfortunately, the vinyl for that is decently expensive compared to normal sign vinyl, but it's several times thicker and designed to be removed from things. Look up "Sandblast resist" - Amazon carries it in a bunch of sizes.


So I looked into the box and found some heat transfer stuff and decided to give that a try. I was actually able to iron them onto the side using medium heat (the "wool" setting.) It took about 20 seconds of rubbing the tip of the iron in slow circles to complete the transfer. After about a minute of cooling time I applied an extra coat of clear enamel over that side of the blaster to really seal it in. Its staying on very well. With effort you could probably pick them off but you would would have to scratch through the clear coat first and unless I drop it directly on concrete it should be fine.
Posted Image
This is what the heat transfer looks like on a modified rebelle guardian crossbow. I made this one for my little sister's birthday and we dubbed it the "Nebula Rev-6." The best part was when she saw the lettering for the first time and actually grabbed the blaster out of my hands and hugged it! So yeah I think I'm going to be doing this more in the future. :)

Edited by ravetrooper, 04 November 2014 - 11:36 PM.

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Gut the electronics, drill a hole in the shell, and attach a crank to the gear. Bam, crank-action stampede that doesn't require batteries, or even a trigger.

...(also judging by your past posts, I would consider you pretty dang wise elder like in the modding community :lol: )


#7 ravetrooper

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 11:54 PM

Other note: I could also see modders who sell their guns use this to put their nh name on the inside of the shell somewhere, like when photographers put their sig at the bottom of a picture. I may just quickly brand all my blasters with my name and phone # before a war in case I lose one. Which I haven't done yet but you never know. ;)
  • 0

Gut the electronics, drill a hole in the shell, and attach a crank to the gear. Bam, crank-action stampede that doesn't require batteries, or even a trigger.

...(also judging by your past posts, I would consider you pretty dang wise elder like in the modding community :lol: )


#8 roboman

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 12:46 AM

That looks really sweet. Does the heat transfer stuff cut just like normal vinyl sheet?
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#9 Guest_TheSilverhead_*

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 10:34 AM

Damn! I've had a Cricut paper/vinyl cutter for years, but I never thought to make transfers. On the same note, I use 110 lb cardstock, print an outline, and cut with an exacto for spraypaint stencils. Much cheaper than vinyl, if not the best results.
Thanks for the idea, man. Sick lettering is in my future...

Edited by TheSilverhead, 05 November 2014 - 10:35 AM.

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#10 ravetrooper

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 07:21 PM

That looks really sweet. Does the heat transfer stuff cut just like normal vinyl sheet?

It works in a vinyl cutter, but you have to adjust the blade height so that it only cuts through the top layer and not the adhesive.
NOTE: always reverse your image (left/right) before you print on heat transfer because you actually flip it over when placing it on your surface.

This is an example I recently put on my modified roughcut:Posted Image


...I use 110 lb cardstock, print an outline, and cut with an exacto for spraypaint stencils...
Thanks for the idea, man. Sick lettering is in my future...


This was my first method but I stopped due to not being able to get a good edge seal. I was using masking tape though, what did you use to adhere the cardstock to the blaster while spraypainting?

Edited by ravetrooper, 08 November 2014 - 07:31 PM.

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Gut the electronics, drill a hole in the shell, and attach a crank to the gear. Bam, crank-action stampede that doesn't require batteries, or even a trigger.

...(also judging by your past posts, I would consider you pretty dang wise elder like in the modding community :lol: )



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