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Spin Stabilization?

rifling a nerf barrel or finned darts

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#1 okto

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Posted 07 July 2004 - 04:09 PM

a comment made in my silencer thread about excess friction in the barrel inducing spin got me thinking: how feasible would it be to induce spin in a desirable way to stabilize a projectile in flight, giving longer range and greater accuracy?
discussion, ready go! ^_^
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#2 xedice

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Posted 07 July 2004 - 04:27 PM

I've tried this, the friction of the rifling slows down the stefan way too much, although you may get different results. Haven't tried fins yet. Spud gun sites sell rifled PVC, but they are huge in diameter, fit for potatoes.
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#3 Vassili

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Posted 07 July 2004 - 05:57 PM

I tried it with PETG. It didn't really work that well, the darts had very abnormal flight patterns and the reason one of the shots went 135 feet was because the dart decided to spin upwards. I never did find a very good way to keep the PETG very straight, so someone could probably make a better rifled barrel and get better results, but I doubt it will help at all.

Why do I not think it will work? With a rifled barrel, air can seap around the dart through the rifled grooves in the barrel, losing air pressure behing the dart. The benefit of the dart spinning just won't be able to make up for the lost air pressure.

The reason that rifled barrels work with firearms is because the bullet slightly expands from the heat and fills up the grooves. If someone was to make well-made darts with fins and made the fins spin in the grooves of the rifled barrel, you might get some good results. But, of course, making darts with fins is no easy task, and the added range will not be worth the extra hours put into making darts.

::edit:: And goddamnit okto, get a different avatar. That goes for you guys, too, NinjZ, crankymonky, and Katachi.

Edited by Vassili, 07 July 2004 - 06:00 PM.

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#4 GeneralPrimevil

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Posted 07 July 2004 - 09:26 PM

To make a dart that will expand to fit the barrel isn't that hard. Essentially, all that one has to do is melt away the inside of the dart starting at the back going forward, making the carve in an inverted cone shape. If done, there are two pluses to doing this: increased surface area at contact point with pressurized air and expansion of dart to fit the inside of the barrel. When I did this with a non-rifled barrel on my supersoaker, I noticed increase range with darts like this compared to darts of the same weight with the foam intact.
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#5 rawray7

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Posted 07 July 2004 - 09:55 PM

i've found darts with two grooves (180* apart(opposites side of the dart)) that wind slighty from about 1/3" from the glue to the bottom fly really straight in my crossbow.

downsides:
1. they don't fly straight much more often than a well made regular dart.
2. they take longer to make, and it is easy to go too deep in the grooves (i burn them with the tip of the glue gun)
3. They break and get chewed up by your nerfing environment much easier...and thus don't live as long as a "well made" dart.
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#6 okto

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Posted 07 July 2004 - 11:27 PM

vassili, none of the aforementioned rudeboys is going to deny his calling. oi!

Edited by okto, 07 July 2004 - 11:42 PM.

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#7 Vintage

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Posted 07 July 2004 - 11:42 PM

Rawray7, I did the same thing once on my darts. I burned 3 grooves only slightly spiraled, and they did well. Only problem was, I had no modified dart guns at the time, so I didn't notice much difference. I should try it again to see if I notice anything better.

The problem is making the grooves perfectly balanced and spiraling in unison. Also, the actual amount of spiral can harm the flight of the dart.

I would just ask for alot of people to try to experiment with melting slight grooves in their darts and report results. I will.

~Vintage
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#8 Vassili

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Posted 08 July 2004 - 10:52 AM

We also tried burning grooves in the darts, but they didn't really perform any better than normal stefans. They just weren't worth the time needed to burn the grooves. Also, as Ray said, they could not stand the Nerfing environment as well as normal stefans.
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#9 THIRST

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Posted 08 July 2004 - 08:34 PM

I made darts with "wings" awhile back. They worked really well if the wings were made well, it gained range and accuracy because it gained lift. Slightly had to produce, hard to get wings correct, and wings will fal off after repeated use. Basically, theyre just for scewing around, and they worked quite well, but they get destroyed in the rain.

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