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Strengthened Trigger Spring for 1500

This one's for you, bob.

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#1 erich76

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 06:13 PM

This is a really simple alternative to potting your trigger spring. This makes for a consistent trigger pull, whether you pull the trigger slowly, or quickly, it will release the air very fast. If you pot your trigger, the speed of your air release is completely reliant on the speed of your trigger pull. In a war situation where how fast you pull the trigger is usually the last thing on your mind, consistency is much more important in my mind. Not to mention, I feel the spring releases the air faster anyways.

Materials/Tools Needed:
-Dremel with a small sanding drum, or any other abrasive bit.
-AT3K pump
-Hacksaw
-Wire Cutters
-Supermaxx 1500 (duh)

Step one:
Take your trigger and grind it down with your dremel so it appears as shown. The two spots circled are where the trigger needs to be shaved down. What this does is allows the trigger to go further back, and allows the spring to "load up" more so that it stores more energy, and thus propels the rod faster for a faster air release.
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Step two:
Cut down your shell to allow the trigger to go further back. There will be a little dimple in the piece of plastic that prevents your trigger from moving back. This is where you need to cut to. Any more is unnecessary. You must do this on both sides of the shell.
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Step three:
You are now going to replace the trigger spring with a much stronger one. Remember all those AT3K pumps everyone throws out after replacing theirs? Well grab yours out of the trash, and cut it apart with your hacksaw at the seam. Take out the OPRV spring, and cut it down about 2 or 3 coils with your wire cutters. It may fly when it cuts, so make sure you hold on to it.
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Screw the old spring off of the firing pin, and twist the new one on.
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Sidenote: The old trigger spring works great as a replacement OPRV spring for both Panthers and Rangemasters.

Reassemble your gun and be amazed at the better trigger pull! Also, please don't turn this thread into a debate about potting trigger springs, I can upload a short video of the trigger working properly if anyone still thinks that potting trigger springs is effective. I'll even post a conservation of energy formula:
WNC + KE1 + PE1 = KE2.
Also, I don't have any before and after ranges, however the gun now leaves a bigger dent in a cardboard box than before. The spring can also overcome the force of a plugged pump blaster.

Comments, questions, flames?

Edited by erich76, 13 October 2012 - 08:08 PM.

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#2 BiwinningPanda

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 06:46 PM

I don't completely understand this. Wouldn't making the trigger harder to pull slow air release? I could be wrong.
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#3 erich76

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 06:56 PM

I don't completely understand this. Wouldn't making the trigger harder to pull slow air release? I could be wrong.

No. The spring stores potential energy, which is used later to force the firing pin back faster, because you have a faster spring
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#4 BiwinningPanda

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 07:25 PM

No. The spring stores potential energy, which is used later to force the firing pin back faster, because you have a faster spring

Oh, ok thanks.I wasn't sure about that.
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LT.DAN ICE CREAM!!!!!! In response to the Tribal Council: Someone break out the Michael Jackson popcorn gif, this shit just got interesting.

#5 Buffdaddy

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 08:04 PM

No. The spring stores potential energy, which is used later to force the firing pin back faster, because you have a faster spring


Oh, ok thanks.I wasn't sure about that.


Yeah, that was the original intent of the design. Once the valve actually opens, the spring helps to snap the firing pin back. Some people prefer just fusing/gluing the trigger to the firing pin and pulling really hard, especially in plugged pump blasters that need more force to open the valve anyway. Although the idea of upgrading the spring at the same time is intriguing.
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#6 erich76

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 08:08 PM

Yeah, that was the original intent of the design. Once the valve actually opens, the spring helps to snap the firing pin back. Some people prefer just fusing/gluing the trigger to the firing pin and pulling really hard, especially in plugged pump blasters that need more force to open the valve anyway. Although the idea of upgrading the spring at the same time is intriguing.


I've found that the stock spring cant even overcome the power of the spring the pushes the pin forward, and actually limits the airflow a bit. A considerably longer and stronger spring fixes this problem. But even the stock design is more consistent than potting the trigger. Although, you are wrong on one point. It's not the spring that actually opens the tank. The trigger actually pushes on the back of the pin through the middle of the spring, and opens the tank. Once it opens the spring snaps the pin back.

Edited by erich76, 13 October 2012 - 08:29 PM.

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#7 spencerak

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 08:43 PM

disregard, My computer crapped and posted like an hour late for some reason.

Edited by spencerak, 13 October 2012 - 08:47 PM.

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Holy shit it's Captain Slug.


#8 erich76

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 08:48 PM

He isn't actually slowing down the trigger pull, he is putting a new stronger spring on the end of the pin ware many people glue over the old one or replace it with part of a pen. By increasing the strength of the spring on the end of the pin that the trigger pushes back on it allows more pressure to build up before releasing the air in the tank resulting a a more consistent release speed no matter the trigger pull speed because the pressure on the spring must exceed the air pressure pushing on the part sealing the tank for the tank to open. I know Dan beaver (I think) did a much better job of explaining that a while back but I cant find the thread


It's still not the spring that initially opens the tank. The spring itself still isn't strong enough to overcome the strength of the air pressure. If it were, putting that there would be the same thing as potting the trigger. What is happening is, is that the spring compresses as the trigger moves back. Once the spring cannot compress anymore, the force your finger exerts on the trigger, goes directly to the firing pin and pulls it back. Once the initial force from the air pressure that was keeping the firing pin in the forward position is relieved, the spring snaps the pin back.
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#9 spencerak

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Posted 14 October 2012 - 10:48 AM

It's still not the spring that initially opens the tank. The spring itself still isn't strong enough to overcome the strength of the air pressure. If it were, putting that there would be the same thing as potting the trigger. What is happening is, is that the spring compresses as the trigger moves back. Once the spring cannot compress anymore, the force your finger exerts on the trigger, goes directly to the firing pin and pulls it back. Once the initial force from the air pressure that was keeping the firing pin in the forward position is relieved, the spring snaps the pin back.


That is sort of what I was trying to explain, I just didn't do a good job at it.
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Holy shit it's Captain Slug.



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