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What is the best kind?

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#1 Epic Pie

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 07:08 PM

For painting Nerf blasters, what will stick better, or at all; acrylic, oil, spray-paint, or something else?
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#2 RedShot

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 08:32 PM

Oil paints, haha... Typically paint that says 'For plastics' on it is a good way to go and I know many spray paints have their own plastic bonding paint line. Just check around and look for them.
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#3 Epic Pie

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 08:34 PM

Yeah, that one was kind of a joke, so just specialized paints work. Thanks.
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#4 Curly

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 08:34 PM

For plastic Vinyl dye (found in some auto departments) penetrates the plastic rather than coat it. I've heard you don't need to sand as aggressively as with paint because the dye doesn't stick to anything, it dyes. Specialized paints don't necessarily work, plastic spray paint has been horrible for me in the past. Vinyl dye also doesn't alter the feel of the blaster much as the color comes from within- how sweet :blush:

Edited by Curly, 17 April 2012 - 08:36 PM.

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#5 The Crazy Eagle

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 11:08 PM

I've been lurking on this forum for several years now, since I wasn't old enough, and I've seen some great guides, links are below

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In My Opinion, the best tutorial..

#6 andtheherois

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:04 AM

For your base coat, Krylon fusion or Vinyl dye work well. Just make sure to match your base coat to your color pallet, I.e. lighter base coat for ligheter colors, darker base for dark. On top of that acrylics and enamels usually work well if you're using paint brushes. If you're using sprays be careful, as some will interact with each other and ruin what you were probably going for.
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#7 ShaNayNay

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 05:44 PM

For your base coat, Krylon fusion or Vinyl dye work well. Just make sure to match your base coat to your color pallet, I.e. lighter base coat for ligheter colors, darker base for dark.

Exactly what I was going to say. Krylon Fusion for plastics is probably the best spray paint. that's what I use. My sure you do a few relatively thin coats. Only one or two will change the texture of your blaster and feel a bit rough rather than smooth.
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#8 Ambience 327

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 06:29 AM

To further expound on "several thin coats" - this means keep your spray can well back from your blaster, not up-close and personal, so that you get a light, even coat of paint rather than an over-soaked, flowing and bubbling mess. Simply dust back and forth a few times with the spray until you have basically covered the blaster, then leave it be for the recommended drying time. The first coat or two might not even completely cover over the old color, but as you keep adding layers, it will. You will find that this ends up in a much better, more even finish, with less distortion of small details and far less unsightly "runny paint" lines on your blasters.
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#9 Epic Pie

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 10:09 AM

To further expound on "several thin coats" - this means keep your spray can well back from your blaster, not up-close and personal, so that you get a light, even coat of paint rather than an over-soaked, flowing and bubbling mess. Simply dust back and forth a few times with the spray until you have basically covered the blaster, then leave it be for the recommended drying time. The first coat or two might not even completely cover over the old color, but as you keep adding layers, it will. You will find that this ends up in a much better, more even finish, with less distortion of small details and far less unsightly "runny paint" lines on your blasters.


Yeah, I have quite a bit of experience with spray paint, I was think more of what kind of paint to use for detailing. Acrylic works good you guys say? Great, I have some lying around.
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#10 ZoMbIe HuNtEr

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 10:46 AM

Yeah, I have quite a bit of experience with spray paint, I was think more of what kind of paint to use for detailing. Acrylic works good you guys say? Great, I have some lying around.


In addition, if you want to make your paintjobs last as long as possible, be sure to do a layer or 2 of clear coat.
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#11 TagMaster247

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 10:59 AM

I use spray paint mostly (Krylon Fusion works best for me), but if I need some detailing, I'll use a foam brush and some acrylic paint.

Edited by TagMaster247, 19 April 2012 - 11:00 AM.


#12 Epic Pie

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 01:08 PM

In addition, if you want to make your paintjobs last as long as possible, be sure to do a layer or 2 of clear coat.


OK, will 2 layers work fine for high stress areas, like the priming handle of the Maverick?
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#13 nickb2000

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 03:37 PM

paint that says "for plastics"
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#14 ShaNayNay

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 08:52 PM

paint that says "for plastics"


...Thanks, as this hasn't been mentioned at least once yet.

Anyway, I hand painted the green stock part of my old double shot with orange acrylic a while back. Acrylic paints are definitely good and best for detail. I suggest sanding the area a bit before you paint, and you'll find, if you haven't already, that it takes lots of layers of paint to look good. It in most cases scratches off easy, so be weary of that. I found that it isn't too good for using as the primary paint for large portion of the gun such as a stock since it scratches easy and doesn't look as good and clean as spray paint in large quantities.

Thant is really all I have to offer regarding painting, I don't know much else yet regarding acrylic. Hope this helps!
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#15 Epic Pie

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 09:55 PM

...Thanks, as this hasn't been mentioned at least once yet.

Anyway, I hand painted the green stock part of my old double shot with orange acrylic a while back. Acrylic paints are definitely good and best for detail. I suggest sanding the area a bit before you paint, and you'll find, if you haven't already, that it takes lots of layers of paint to look good. It in most cases scratches off easy, so be weary of that. I found that it isn't too good for using as the primary paint for large portion of the gun such as a stock since it scratches easy and doesn't look as good and clean as spray paint in large quantities.

Thant is really all I have to offer regarding painting, I don't know much else yet regarding acrylic. Hope this helps!


Great, thanks. Yeah, sanding is a must.
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#16 BritNerfMogul

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 10:48 AM

Great, thanks. Yeah, sanding is a must.


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#17 Epic Pie

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 11:03 AM

Ohh, I see I'm the "Effeminate" pie, lies. I like sanding, it just gives it a better feel, and helps the paint get into the cracks easier, but thanks. All the paint you use seems kind of hard to get in the U.S.
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