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Explain Red Dot/reflex Sights

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#1 thedom21

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 07:50 PM

Ok, so I am going to make red dot/reflex sights for aesthetic reason on some of my guns but don't fully understand how they work. Diagrams would be great. It there is enough interest in them when they are done I will sell them.
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#2 kidame tomanaka

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 08:08 PM

most "red dot" sight are just led light that are pointing toward the center of some transparent surface, example plexi glass, all they really are is just a way to aim you gun (or in this case your blaster) with out using iron sights, you see iron sights can sometimes cover the area of viewing with the motel rods that will stick up, red dots eliminate this by utilizing a small colored light that allows users to view the target with out anything being in the way, but for what its worth your better off buying the one that nerf has available, but if you choose to make your own heres a link for the YouTube user Hdingo, which is the only guy i know who has a tutorial for making one



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#3 Solscud007

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 10:42 PM

Sort of. Ok first of all lets get the obligatory "sights are useless in nerf" out of the way.

On to the science of explaining red dots and the like.

Actually Red dots/holorgraphics sights and reflex sights are designed after the infamous "laser sight"

Lasers have their place in the real firearm world. As many of you have used a laser pointer at some point in time, they are bright and point where you aim it.

Now mount that to a gun and make the laser adjustable and voila!!! You have a laser sight.

Sights obviously help you to aim. When adjusted properly, where you aim is where the bullet goes.

Now with iron sights, they work all the time, except when it is dark. However the downside to iron sights is that you have to look at them just right. You keep the front post in focus.

Hold out your thumb at arms length. Stare intently at your thumb. Everything past your thumb will be fuzzy and slightly out of focus. Close one eye and it isnt so blurry.

This is just like Iron sights. You usually need to close one eye, unless you are really good and can do it with both eyes open.

Laser sights allow you keep both eyes open. However there are always downsides. laser sights, like the Nitefinder, dont work to will when it is bright or something is far.

The one benefit to laser sights is that you do not have to be behind the weapon to shoot. Lasers practically project your sights onto the target. say you are pushed to the ground. you can pull out your gun, project a laser dot on the chest of the badguy and shoot. if you use iron sights, then you have to get your gun up to your eyes. This is not always feasible.

Oh also laser sights, light flashlights, can give away your position so they are not always used if you want to shoot someone, but dont want your position to be known. (Otherwise you need Night vision and IR lasers to be ninja invisible)

How step in the red dot. Red dots still suffer from the fact that you have to keep your head behind the sights. however you can keep both eyes open. This is called quick target acquisition.

Once your gun is up, you will see a bright red dot. almost like a laser, and you just point that dot (assuming it is accurate and sighted in) and you will hit whatever you point it at.

Red dots are only visible to the eye that is directly behind the weapon sight. So it doesnt give away your position. It works in any lighting condition. It is by far the best for close quarter battles.

I hope this helps.
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#4 BrokenSVT

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Posted 24 December 2010 - 11:05 PM

So I totally just redesigned the space shuttle, but haven't a FUCKING clue how to get into outer space. If one of you techy engineering nerds could help me with the fine details, we're all going to be rich. Halp me please.
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#5 phillypretzel

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Posted 25 December 2010 - 12:04 PM

Ok, so I am going to make red dot/reflex sights for aesthetic reason on some of my guns but don't fully understand how they work. Diagrams would be great. It there is enough interest in them when they are done I will sell them.


Since red dot/reflex sites are available for airsoft guns for $.99, why reinvent the wheel? And I do hope you can turn a profit @ $.99. Best of luck.

Oh, and BrokenSVT, my N-Strike solid fuel booster rockets and high altitude guidance systems are in the final stages of development: I'll post the write up soon. I am having some difficulty with my Nerf foamy thermonuclear device though, any input would be appreciated.

Edit: And thedom21, just to demonstrate I'm not kidding, here's a link to some cheapo sights you can buy to make more efficient use of your time: http://www.kapowwe.c...rsoft-Guns.html

Edited by phillypretzel, 25 December 2010 - 12:09 PM.

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#6 Solscud007

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Posted 25 December 2010 - 01:51 PM

I agree. Just buy the cheapy airsoft ones. Or buy the reflex sight from Nerf. I modified mine with a nice clear transparent piece of plastic that I cut from the bubble off of one of my Transformer toy packaging.

The stock window is not clear enough and the cross hairs that are etched into the stock window, actually makes it harder to see what is behind the sight.
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