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Amazing Paint Job - How Can I Learn This?


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#1 gmoff

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 02:32 AM

So there are any number of basic nerf painting guides around (sand, prime, mask, spray, seal) but I ran across this tonight:

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and obviously this goes way beyond those basic guides. I would love to be learn to generate similar quality work. Does anyone know of a guide for work like this, on Nerf or otherwise, or possibly be able to create one?

Thanks much!

Edited by gmoff, 04 August 2010 - 02:34 AM.

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#2 Axelion burnout

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 03:05 AM

Serpent loser made a tutorial a while ago.

That thread (and video) should answer your question.
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#3 gmoff

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 03:17 AM

Serpent loser made a tutorial a while ago.

That thread (and video) should answer your question.


Thanks for the link, but there is no content in that thread and the links to the videos no longer work. I PM'd the creator to see if I can get the videos hosted again, unless someone knows where else I can find them.
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#4 Axelion burnout

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 03:18 AM

Serpent loser made a tutorial a while ago.

That thread (and video) should answer your question.


Thanks for the link, but there is no content in that thread and the links to the videos no longer work. I PM'd the creator to see if I can get the videos hosted again, unless someone knows where else I can find them.



I actually have it. I'll send you a PM and we can figure out a way to get that to you.
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#5 Aj

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 04:11 AM

Just by looking at it I'd say there is a 95% chance that that blaster was painted using citadel miniatures paints - other wise known as games workshop. These paints are pricey but as far as acrylics go they are some of the best in my opinion.

I used to play a lot of warhammer when I was younger and particularly enjoyed painted, even winning a few local competitions for my miniatures.

So my suggestion is to look for tutorials on how to use citadel paints - gameworkshop.com is probably a good place to start.

In particular tutorials on painting tanks, especially tau or space marine tanks would be of use, as thes tanks feature large flat surfaces and panelling very similar to nerf guns.

The maverick you posted uses a lot of drybrushing, highlighting and shading. Some of the shading appears to have been done using inks, and given the smoothness I'd suspect some glazes were used on the red to smooth it out. All of these terms (using inks, drybrushing, glazing etc) are things you should search for and you'll find detailed tutorials in abundance on both GW and 3rd party hobby sites all over the web.

Also of note is that this maverick used a gloss varnish to give that deep, rich, shiny finish, which has been left off on the metallic parts to create contrasts. There should be plenty of tutorials about for applying this kind of finish also, and both matte and gloss varnish can be bought in spray and brush on form.

Hope this helps, remember take your time, have patience and look at your painting objectively, it's on of the hardest things to do, everyone in warhammer thinks their painting is super good when this is true for only about 5% of the hobbyists.. every one develops their 'own eyes' for their paintjobs, which just seem not to notice that big fleck of green you accidentally got on the black or whatever.. but try and avoid it.. get other people to point out flaws and dont be angry when they do, they're helping you become a better painter.

Aj
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#6 serpent sniper

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 03:39 PM

gmoff - I got your PM. You don't have an email address listed on your profile, otherwise I would have emailed you the video.

Anyways, my video won't really help you achieve a look like that gun. As Aj pointed out, that gun is mostly drybrushed and my guns have a different style. I do briefly demonstrate how I use inks, so if you still want it I can email you.

The basic process for a gun like that, or at least how I would do it would be like this:

Black basecoat
Drybrush colors from dark to light
Blending ink (so in this case a red ink was used to blend everything)
Ink for grime effect (something black, brown, chestnut, maybe more than one)
Drybrush edges with light color
Seal

That's more or less how I do any of my guns, I just do a textured stippling technique instead of drybrush the whole thing.
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#7 gmoff

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 07:20 PM

Thanks for the info. Axelion was nice enough to send me the video, its very helpful for a beginner like me, even if its not quite the same effect.

So, I thought that drybrushing was for adding detail just to raised surfaces, are you saying that the main red coat on this blaster was ALL drybrused? How would I go about applying that much paint with a method designed to just pick out details?

Thanks again for the help guys.

Edited by gmoff, 04 August 2010 - 07:21 PM.

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#8 dizzyduck

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 08:09 PM

So, I thought that drybrushing was for adding detail just to raised surfaces, are you saying that the main red coat on this blaster was ALL drybrused? How would I go about applying that much paint with a method designed to just pick out details?


The method relies on creating color intensity by layering multiple coats of drybrush. First a coat of black is applied, then colors are layered on top with a bristle brush or synthetic sable brush, working from large areas to small areas. The trick is to make each coat more intense than the first but not completely cover the layers underneath.

Raised edges have the most color saturation or intensity, whereas flat surfaces have more of the black showing through. Also you're going to want a good clear coat that doesn't muddy the acrylic paints.

It's my opinion that the brand of paint you use isn't as important as the technique. I use artist quality acrylic paints - the kind they sell at someplace like Micheal's or AC Moore - but those can be pricey.
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#9 serpent sniper

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 08:09 PM

Yes, I think the main coat was all drybrushed.

Drybrushing is used on the raised bits, but if you do the same technique to a flat area, you leave a thin coat of paint. It gives it that blurred or soft look that the gun you posted has, and allows you to mix the tones as you add more layers.

I use a big flat brush with soft bristles for drybrushing. There's no trick to drybrushing a flat part. You might want less paint of the brush than if you were doing corners, but you just keep brushing it until it starts picking up color.
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