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Deckel Rifle

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#1 k9turrent

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 10:45 PM

Deckel (Dachshund) Rifle
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One of the easier homemades that is still able to become a respectable primary. It only uses commonly found materials and simply handyman tools, and it's cheap to make.

Time required: 4 hours
Total Cost: ~$20


Materials:

- 3ft length of 2x4 Canadian pine = $3
- 2.5ft length of 1.5" ABS = $3
- PVC coupler = $1
- 2ft of 1/2" CPVC = $3
- CPVC TEE = $.49
- Assorted screws = $3
- Zip-ties = $2
- Wire coat Hanger = Dry Cleaning

Tools needed: (more can be used)

- Saw
- Drill & bits
- Sandpaper
- Pliers



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Link to Suggested Plunger Head instructions
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QUOTE View Post

That's about it. And thanks Angela who helped me with these pictures.. It looks huge in her hands.


HOLY CRAP!

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#2 k9turrent

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 10:47 PM

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QUOTE View Post

That's about it. And thanks Angela who helped me with these pictures.. It looks huge in her hands.


HOLY CRAP!

FU ALL

#3 k9turrent

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 10:49 PM

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Add a barrel, and you are done!!!
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No official Ranges: WHY?

I don't own a spring that is 11" long, but I was able to test it with a bungees and It actually hit 50ft. But I also tested by turning the gun into a pushpull gun, and it achieved 80ft. So if I am able to find a spring to fit the gun, this could bet hitting insane ranges


Final lookback:

Pro:
- Cheap
- Compact forward length
- It's Canadian Pine
- It vaccum-loads

Cons:
- Spring length is rare
- I got a splinter
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QUOTE View Post

That's about it. And thanks Angela who helped me with these pictures.. It looks huge in her hands.


HOLY CRAP!

FU ALL

#4 ilzot

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 11:47 PM

Not sure if they ship to Canada, but maybe you could get an American friend to buy one and ship it to you.

Custom compression springs, built to your specs.

Site - http://www.springhou...ion_springs.htm

Order form - http://www.springhou...Compression.xls

Didn't look at prices or whatever, but it shouldn't be hard to figure out.

Nice job on the homemade though, I like seeing woodwork in Nerf terms.
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QUOTE(Vinnie D. @ Feb 1 2010, 05:28 AM) View Post

... to be able to get a better burst or sustained fire, rather than blowing the whole load at once.


#5 Blue

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 12:09 AM

What is your plunger head?
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#6 HOTH

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 12:35 AM

Jesus thats cool. The wooded body is sexy.
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#7 bourbon

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 01:59 AM

So the bent coat hanger is the catch, and the bungees pull it down? How does the trigger work exactly?
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#8 Zorns Lemma

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 01:58 PM

So the bent coat hanger is the catch, and the bungees pull it down? How does the trigger work exactly?


You push the coat hanger bit up using the CPVC I presume.

I question certain structural components of this blaster. Could you get a strong, but short, spring and just prime it and see if it will hold? It won't help with ranges, but priming stress at full load is regardless of power delivered to prime the blaster.
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#9 k9turrent

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 02:26 PM

You push the coat hanger bit up using the CPVC I presume.

I question certain structural components of this blaster. Could you get a strong, but short, spring and just prime it and see if it will hold? It won't help with ranges, but priming stress at full load is regardless of power delivered to prime the blaster.

Yes and I have had about 25lb by using bungees, but I didn't fire the gun cause the bands broke...
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QUOTE View Post

That's about it. And thanks Angela who helped me with these pictures.. It looks huge in her hands.


HOLY CRAP!

FU ALL

#10 1337

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 04:27 PM

I can bring you up a +bow spring (and a k19 if you want it) when we come up for massacre.

Other than that, nice gun.
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#11 angelfalcon

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 04:58 PM

Two things:

If you're right handed, tapping that CPVC is probably hard, I would rig up a keyring or coathanger rod for it.

Also, I would cut a hole for your thumb in that wood, like an L96A1 or WA2000 -

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QUOTE

According to your mom, size matters. My blaster is four feet long. What about yours?

QUOTE

I measured mine and I got about 11 inches.

#12 k9turrent

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 06:27 PM

I can bring you up a +bow spring (and a k19 if you want it) when we come up for massacre.

Other than that, nice gun.

Thank you, Pm incoming

Two things:

If you're right handed, tapping that CPVC is probably hard, I would rig up a keyring or coathanger rod for it.

Also, I would cut a hole for your thumb in that wood, like an L96A1 or WA2000 -


I use my middle finger to push it, but longer piece would be better.
And I don't own a drill bit large enough to make decent thumbhole, I'm working on it...
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QUOTE View Post

That's about it. And thanks Angela who helped me with these pictures.. It looks huge in her hands.


HOLY CRAP!

FU ALL

#13 rork

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 12:54 AM

You made a nerf gun from a 2x4. Props. I am interested by your catch, but inclined to agree with Zorn. If the coathanger itself forms the catch, there's no way in hell it's gonna hold up under spring tension. Maybe try high-quality music wire or a thin steel rod instead.
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#14 thedap

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 02:03 AM

have you got access to a propane torch? I use torches to help with woodwork. you just roast the wood and scrape off the charcoal. pretty much like burnt toast.

try not to get too carried away with the heat, it causes any cracks in the wood to expand if the heat gets too deep.

it helps a bunch with sanding too, you just burn the surface and hit it with a sanding block or sanding sponge.

you could drill a hole for the thumb and wobble the drill to get it a little bigger, then burn it over and over to get it big enough.

otherwise take an old screwdriver and use it like a chisel. a hammer makes just about anything work like a chisel. torching the wood after will clean it up fine.

early crossbows (real crossbows) used a lever and a dowel pin to trigger the crossbow. the string was in a groove over the hole for the dowelpin (like your hole in the extra block) the handle was tied to the stock and squeezing it up against the stock pushed the dowel up the groove and forced the string up out of the groove.

you could cut a groove in the wood below where the notch on your plunger sits. the wire could be bent into a rectangle and the ends could be bent down like a little handle. the dowel hole would be drilled up through the stock and hit the middle of your groove is sawn. drill a hole in your dowel tip for the tiny handle on the wire.

the dowel would be long enough to stick out the bottom of the stock. you could either push the dowel directly or use a handle like the crossbows used.

as a side note, the notch and dowel setup is pretty darn strong. a friend made a real crossbow completely out of hardwood and the string, no metal at all. a stray shot bounced off a forklift, a steel beam and then went through a 12 pack of soda, lengthwise! it could easily kill someone.
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#15 Carbon

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 02:54 AM

I wouldn't worry about the strength of the coathanger. The finishing nails I use for catchpins are half the gauge of coathanger wire, and probably only a little harder. It should be fine.

Oh, and I gotta say...

otherwise take an old screwdriver and use it like a chisel. a hammer makes just about anything work like a chisel.

Or maybe just use a chisel. Dull tools lead to damage and injury. Misused tools doubly so.
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#16 k9turrent

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 09:00 AM

have you got access to a propane torch? I use torches to help with woodwork. you just roast the wood and scrape off the charcoal. pretty much like burnt toast.

try not to get too carried away with the heat, it causes any cracks in the wood to expand if the heat gets too deep.

it helps a bunch with sanding too, you just burn the surface and hit it with a sanding block or sanding sponge.

you could drill a hole for the thumb and wobble the drill to get it a little bigger, then burn it over and over to get it big enough.

otherwise take an old screwdriver and use it like a chisel. a hammer makes just about anything work like a chisel. torching the wood after will clean it up fine.


Even though I do like a bit of fire every once in a while, I live in an apartment building, and I have already accidentally brought the fire department to the build with my aluminium forge on my balcony...

early crossbows (real crossbows) used a lever and a dowel pin to trigger the crossbow. the string was in a groove over the hole for the dowelpin (like your hole in the extra block) the handle was tied to the stock and squeezing it up against the stock pushed the dowel up the groove and forced the string up out of the groove.

you could cut a groove in the wood below where the notch on your plunger sits. the wire could be bent into a rectangle and the ends could be bent down like a little handle. the dowel hole would be drilled up through the stock and hit the middle of your groove is sawn. drill a hole in your dowel tip for the tiny handle on the wire.

the dowel would be long enough to stick out the bottom of the stock. you could either push the dowel directly or use a handle like the crossbows used.

That was my original idea, but that would put my firing hand right beside my shoulder stock.

as a side note, the notch and dowel setup is pretty darn strong. a friend made a real crossbow completely out of hardwood and the string, no metal at all. a stray shot bounced off a forklift, a steel beam and then went through a 12 pack of soda, lengthwise! it could easily kill someone.


Very Nice
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QUOTE View Post

That's about it. And thanks Angela who helped me with these pictures.. It looks huge in her hands.


HOLY CRAP!

FU ALL

#17 AJ R

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 02:49 PM

have you got access to a propane torch? I use torches to help with woodwork. you just roast the wood and scrape off the charcoal. pretty much like burnt toast.

try not to get too carried away with the heat, it causes any cracks in the wood to expand if the heat gets too deep.

it helps a bunch with sanding too, you just burn the surface and hit it with a sanding block or sanding sponge.

you could drill a hole for the thumb and wobble the drill to get it a little bigger, then burn it over and over to get it big enough.

otherwise take an old screwdriver and use it like a chisel. a hammer makes just about anything work like a chisel. torching the wood after will clean it up fine.

early crossbows (real crossbows) used a lever and a dowel pin to trigger the crossbow. the string was in a groove over the hole for the dowelpin (like your hole in the extra block) the handle was tied to the stock and squeezing it up against the stock pushed the dowel up the groove and forced the string up out of the groove.

you could cut a groove in the wood below where the notch on your plunger sits. the wire could be bent into a rectangle and the ends could be bent down like a little handle. the dowel hole would be drilled up through the stock and hit the middle of your groove is sawn. drill a hole in your dowel tip for the tiny handle on the wire.

the dowel would be long enough to stick out the bottom of the stock. you could either push the dowel directly or use a handle like the crossbows used.

as a side note, the notch and dowel setup is pretty darn strong. a friend made a real crossbow completely out of hardwood and the string, no metal at all. a stray shot bounced off a forklift, a steel beam and then went through a 12 pack of soda, lengthwise! it could easily kill someone.


Most of this post made me cringe... I'm a fine woodworker (aspiring luthier, to be specific)
Don't burn the wood, it's a good way to warp the fuck out of it. The only modern reason to expose wood to excessive heat is steam bending. Use a spokeshave. Faster, more effective.

You obviously don't have to patience to use bladed tools and do your sanding by yourself. You don't need a torch to work your wood for you.

Very very good way to fuck over not only your screwdriver, but your project was well. Always best to have a /sharp/ tool, otherwise doing that is dangerous because it forces the person using it to apply more force than is needed. This increases the likelyhood of your hand slipping and you getting hurt.

You could draw your thumbhole, use a .5" drill bit to drill out the corners, and saw between the holes. Afterwards, you use rasps to round things off and then sand it down.
Or, you could make yourself a template and route out the area... with a router, if that isn't clear. I don't know how many people have routers, though... So that may be out of the question.

Anyway, now that I've gotten the safer way to do things across, do whatever you want.

EDIT: and by the way, I just took a moment to process the last part of your post. Nice job having no respect for weapons. Another pet peeve of mine. I'm a hunter's safety kid, and obviously you and maybe your friend need to go through the same course. The reason why I say maybe is because I don't know how he handles his weapon.
Crossbows are not toys, in any way shape or form. You can make a foam tipped arrow, it will still hit like riot shot. The fact that it can kill someone should instill some kind of silent respect for it.
Don't do anything stupid.

Have a sizzlin' day,
AJ

Edited by AJ R., 20 February 2010 - 02:58 PM.

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