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Cable Trigger

on Longshot Front Blaster

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#1 taerKitty

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 11:45 PM

I think I'm going to start all mod topics with a disclaimer that I don't know if it's been done before, but I searched (bicycle brake cable - zilch; brake cable - a near miss) and couldn't find it. Of course, given the mad creativity here, I'd not be surprised if I was wrong.

This writeup is about separating the Longshot Front Blaster's (LSFB) trigger and handle from the blaster itself. I am sure it can be used with other blasters. I developed this for an integration, but it can be used also for 'stealth shots' where your hand is nowhere near the blaster (connected by the bicycle brake cable) and you can still fire it.

That's all there is to the theory. It's drop-dead simple. If you're just wondering what I mean by cable trigger, that's all, folks. This writeup is about one possible implementation.

Posted Image

That's the completed proof-of-concept.

This is not about optimizing the LSFB - there are plenty of posts on how to remove the AR, lube the cylinder and maybe silicone-tape the o-ring (I planned to look at improving the blaster once I knew I didn't blow it up trying to mod it.)

This is only marginally applicable to the standard final resting place for an LSFB: the underslung 'M203' point under the Longshot. I remember reading someone concerned about the standard piano wire cutting into the plastic in the Longshot body. Using a bicycle brake cable was mentioned (that was the only hit I found for 'brake cable'). I just wanted to mention that1dude's post on the LS Front Gun Wire Help thread.

===

Required:

- Longshot Front Blaster
- Bicycle brake cable
- A way to cut the cable (I used boltcutters, but there are specialized tools for cutting the cable)
- A way to cut the tube, which is a steel coil (I used a hacksaw, neater ends this way)
- Pliers
- A mallet or hammer
- A knife
- Rivets - 1/8" diameter x 3/16" - 1/4" grip range
- Finishing Washers ("Rondana #6" is what I used)
- Wood Screw #6 x 1/2"
- Drill with 1/8" bit

===

Disassemble the blaster and remove the orange 'dot' and spring that serves to lock the LSFB in place when it's mounted on the front end of the LS. The LSFB will never go there again.

Close the blaster and screw down the upper right screw, the single long one.

Take the drill and make a 1/8" hole in the internal wall directly in line with the hole at the end of the LSFB you just cleared by removing the orange dot.

The underside of the LSFB has a flange that needs to be cut away to allow the cable anchoring mechanism freedom to slide. These two images show where it was cut from one half of the LSFB body. You'll need to do it for the other as well. This is the region normally covered by the handle if that were attached.

Posted Image

Posted Image

That's it for the LSFB for now. Set it aside.

===

Disassemble the LSFB handle.

Put an 1/8" hole through the front of the handle, above the trigger.

Take a pop rivet, hold the rivet body with the pliers. Place it against a hard surface, pull pin down. Take the mallet or hammer and strike the pliers. This should free the rivet body from the pull-pin. Do this for two rivets, three if you are going to thread two cables out of the trigger mechanism as is shown in the photos below.

Posted Image

Take one of the rivet bodies and insert it in the hole. It should fit easily but snugly. This will keep the metal edges of the bicycle brake cable housing from chewing into the plastic handle.

Thread the bicycle brake cable through the rivet. It will be a close but loose fit. The bike cable must have a clean end; i.e., no stray 'wild hairs'. Trim it down if it does.

===

Take the trigger and put a 1/8" hole in it above the guide slot, toward the rear of the body.

Posted Image

Thread the bicycle brake cable through it. To anchor the cable, crimp a 180-degree bend in it with the pliers. This will weaken the cable, but the cable will also eventually eat through the trigger. How often do you plan to fire your LSFB anyhow?

That's it for the trigger. Reassemble the LSFB handle, leaving one (or, in the photo, two) cables visible.

===

Thread the cable through the cable housing. I'm being deliberately vague about cable lengths because, well, to start with, I got it wrong for my own purposes and will have to get another length of cable + housing. It varies with your usage, but the cable needs to be at least a foot longer than the housing.

Now thread the other rivet body on the cable, wide-end (flange) first.

Next, thread the finishing washer on the cable "rounded" side first.

The LSFB has enough gappage once we pass through the 1/8" hole we drilled earlier that the cable can snake through. Have it enter the top of the trigger bar and thread through the slot.

Posted Image

Lastly, because cable tension / length will need fine adjustment, use a finishing washer and wood screw as an improvised clamp. Thread the finishing washer on the cable concave side first (so the rounded side is 'out' when it is against the bottom of the trigger bar.

Determine the appropriate position and drive the wood screw through the washer and into the trigger bar slot.

===

The cable adds too much resistance to the trigger for the existing springs to return it to station. Given that this is a one-shot blaster, this is not an issue. The LSFB trigger has a front ridge that can be used to nudge it back forward.

Ranges: I didn't range it, but didn't do anything to it besides remove the AR. I'm guessing 20' or so.

Edited by taerKitty, 03 June 2009 - 01:18 AM.

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#2 Blue

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 11:53 PM

So.. it's like the brakes on bicycles right? Very cool.
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#3 Soothsayer

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 11:58 PM

You could make this into a trip wire. Please, for me, make something similar to this in trip wire form.
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yeah I'm that guy who made that cool thing with the cool paint.


#4 ilzot

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 08:24 AM

I do like this idea. Pretty sweet.

Seen some stuff like this involving coat hangers, but this seems like you used materials what they were made for, so they'll stand up a bit longer. Coat hangers always were made for hanging clothing, and not for use in Nerf guns.

I might try this sometime.
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QUOTE(Vinnie D. @ Feb 1 2010, 05:28 AM) View Post

... to be able to get a better burst or sustained fire, rather than blowing the whole load at once.


#5 Draconis

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 09:37 AM

Good job implementing this! I don't really do any integrating, but I had always wondered why no one used sheathed cables. I even have a slightly broken car seat cable I was going to use.
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#6 Skorpion

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 05:16 PM

You could make this into a trip wire. Please, for me, make something similar to this in trip wire form.


If you do that, make a shotgun attachment so you are more likely to hit them with a dart.
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#7 taerKitty

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 05:52 PM

So.. it's like the brakes on bicycles right? Very cool.

Yep. Whereas the bicycle's brake lever applies a lot more leverage translating to a stronger pull, the trigger is very weak. Weak, but strong enough. As you point out, same principle.

You could make this into a trip wire. Please, for me, make something similar to this in trip wire form.

(Replied in PM, but seeing as I'm replying...) The problem with a tripwire is trying to figure out a way to not trip the person; you want the wire to trigger, then yield. You don't want the other person to fall down (and possibly shatter a $100 crossbow.) The other problem is similar - how do you keep the thing on target when it's pulled, and keep it from being pulled free of its mount and fall to the ground.

Seen some stuff like this involving coat hangers, but this seems like you used materials what they were made for, so they'll stand up a bit longer. Coat hangers always were made for hanging clothing, and not for use in Nerf guns.

I might try this sometime.

Hey, my Yalpam (Yet Another Longshot Pump Action Mod) uses coat hanger wire (and was called out on it, too.) Sometimes, you gotta use what's around. ;)

I'd love to see where you use this. I would be stoked to see the idea show up elsewhere!

Good job implementing this! I don't really do any integrating, but I had always wondered why no one used sheathed cables. I even have a slightly broken car seat cable I was going to use.

I'm not sure what a car seat cable is, but sounds like you're comfortable using it. As above, I want very much to see what you do with this!

If you do that, make a shotgun attachment so you are more likely to hit them with a dart.

Good point. The LSFB doesn't have enough oomph to make a good scatter blaster. I saw one person's coupled Titan that had a shotgun barrel. That'd be a great payload.

===

Please note that if you tie a slipknot around the trigger + handle, then you've got yourself a tripwire blaster already. Using a sheathed cable means the cable doesn't have to be taut the whole run, and also you can relocate the trigger.

For a tripwire blaster, you can have the cable go through the handle from the back, then get attached to the front of the trigger. The sheath would then go from where the cable emerges at the back of the handle over to the killzone. At the killzone, the other end of the cable sheath is anchored on one side and the remaining exposed cable (or it can be attached to fishing line for concealment) is anchored to the other size of the killzone.

The advantage here is the length of sheathed cable can be run without need for it to be taut. It can go around corners, over ledges, etc.

One thing to consider: if the admins of this site hate campers so much that they have an autofilter to translate the s-word to 'loser' because Nerf is a "get your ass up and move!" sport, I'm not sure they'd have a positive view of trap blasters. Given that, unless one of the admins says otherwise, I'll refrain from further publicly commenting on the tripwire implementation and focus from now on specifically and solely on the trigger relocation function. I'll be happy to talk about trap blasters in PM, though. (I figure it might work for HvZ...)
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