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Hacksaw?

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#1 TheNerfLoki

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 07:32 PM

I have been lurking around several forums lately and saw that the main saw used is the hacksaw. I was just wondering why. I have used both a hacksaw and coping saw and was faster with the coping saw and had better results. Also I know from the metal working badge in scouts the hacksaw is for metal. If you do not know what a coping saw is here is Wikipedia.
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#2 Mr BadWrench

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 07:42 PM

I use this
http://www.harborfre...temnumber=92599


and
http://www.harborfre...temnumber=39273
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#3 BlackFox

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 07:42 PM

Ah, thanks for clearing that up for me. I guess I've been using a coping saw this whole time.

In response to your question, I don't think there's any particular reason why nerfers use the hack saw. I'd bet that some (like me) actually use some other saw when they say hack saw because it's just a common term we all assosiate with a small, handheld saw.

A hacksaw works better with metals because of the number of teeth per inch. A saw meant for cutting metal should have 18-24 teeth per inch.
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#4 rork

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 08:15 PM

Hacksaws are cheap, and they work just dandy for cutting plastic, as long as you're not trying to do anything too precise. The long cutting stroke gives you more speed, too, which means more than you think when you're working with large chunks of PVC. I find myself using PVC shears for a lot of my fine work, along with the ubiquitous dremel.

Edited by rork, 17 September 2008 - 08:16 PM.

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#5 Z4

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 08:30 PM

I've used a hacksaw, a PVC saw, and a coping saw to cut things, usually whichever I could access first. In my experience, they all cut about the same, with the coping saw leaving a bit of a smoother cut. I've moved away from saws though, I usually use my PVC cutters, tin snips and Dremel for all plastic related jobs. The PVC cutters and tin snips leave much cleaner cuts and the Dremel does as well once you get the hang of it. Saws tend to leave cuts that require sanding or deburring, so I rarely use them anymore. Utility knives also work well for some applications that some use hacksaws for. If I need to use a saw, I use the PVC saw, as it is designed specifically for plastics and slips less when sawing them.

EDIT: After seeing Blasphemy's post, I occasionally use a scrollsaw when doing large-scale work that would result in physical taxation otherwise. (or when I'm making a +bow)

Edited by .Z4., 17 September 2008 - 08:41 PM.

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#6 Swords

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 08:33 PM

I use a coping saw too. Coping saws are cheaper, and they have more flexiblity. But I think that most people use the old hacksaw that they have in the garage.
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#7 Blasphemy

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 08:35 PM

I find that using a scroll saw (or band saw) is far more precise, faster, less physically strenuous, and far cleaner than hand tools like the hacksaw. Trust me, if you own one (or a band saw) use it. That is unless you're supremely lucky and have supremely advanced crap like a mill, or lathe, or any other ridiculously expensive tool (CNC mill/router, water jet, or laser cutting table), in which case I hate you.

EDIT: Of course, more people use hacksaws because most people have them.

Edited by Blasphemy, 17 September 2008 - 08:36 PM.

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#8 Carbon

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 08:41 PM

When I say hacksaw, I mean hacksaw. Plastics typically cut better with finer teeth, which a hacksaw has. Of course, you can also get coping saw blades with a high tooth count as well, so your milage may vary.

The main reason I mostly avoid my coping saw is that I use a hand saw for straight cuts, which are more difficult with a narrow coping saw blade.

Edited by Carbon, 17 September 2008 - 08:42 PM.

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#9 Mr BadWrench

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Posted 17 September 2008 - 11:28 PM

I find that using a scroll saw (or band saw) is far more precise, faster, less physically strenuous, and far cleaner than hand tools like the hacksaw. Trust me, if you own one (or a band saw) use it. That is unless you're supremely lucky and have supremely advanced crap like a mill, or lathe, or any other ridiculously expensive tool (CNC mill/router, water jet, or laser cutting table), in which case I hate you.

EDIT: Of course, more people use hacksaws because most people have them.



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#10 hoshiadam

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Posted 18 September 2008 - 08:43 AM

For cutting brass, I've had good results using a jeweler's saw. Also works pretty well on plastic, but it doesn't have quite the work area behind the blade that a coping or hack saw does.
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#11 TGfeo

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Posted 18 September 2008 - 06:47 PM

I normally use this

http://www.moontrail...a/vista-saw.jpg

takes a shit load of sweat to work through a barrel, let alone minimize a weapon.

#12 AssassinNF

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Posted 18 September 2008 - 11:22 PM

My Band saw can't cut straight lines, my jigsaw is 10-20 years old and it acts like it, my ratcheting pvc cutters cut the pipe at an angle, and everything else in the garage is just overkill, so I use a Dremel with heavy-duty reinforced cutting wheels and/or sandpaper drums for cutting everything.

I've used a Dremel for so long that I'm able to do some insanely precise cuts with it. I cut with it, I sand with it, I obliterate the insides of shells with it... I even drill holes with it.

I used to use a hacksaw until I discovered what I could do with a Dremel. The only time I don't use it to cut something is when I need to cut metal pipe perfectly straight, in which case I use a Pipe Cutter.

I have yet to try out my dad's table saw, though. That may became a favorite.
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#13 lionhead333

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 05:42 AM

You guys are all wimps. I do my cuts with this.

Posted Image

In all seriousness though, I just use an average pipecutter and cheap hacksaw that I found at Lowes.
For $20, it's shit, but it's good shit.
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#14 TheNerfLoki

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Posted 20 September 2008 - 03:55 PM

To lionhead:Very funny.To everyone else (especially carbon): So if the hacksaw has higher tooth counts than why does it cut slower than my coping saw? Is there something wrong with it, or does my coping saw just have a high tooth count blade? Thanks.
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#15 Mr BadWrench

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Posted 20 September 2008 - 06:19 PM

To lionhead:Very funny.To everyone else (especially carbon): So if the hacksaw has higher tooth counts than why does it cut slower than my coping saw? Is there something wrong with it, or does my coping saw just have a high tooth count blade? Thanks.


higher tooth count = smaller teeth = cuts slower

my pullsaw has great big sharp pointy teeth and its abotu 1/2 the thickness of a hacksaw blade... consider it a razor knife with teeth....
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