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Air Tank

Im still trying to make a homemade :P

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#1 h2player116

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Posted 16 August 2008 - 06:59 PM

How much air does it take to make a nerf homemade gun to shoot exactly or around 100ft? Because I dont want to create a tank thats massive and shoots 150+ feet here. So I was wondering what kind of air tank should I use? PVC,CPVC and also how big should I make it?

rundown:
How big
What plastic
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#2 imaseoulman

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Posted 16 August 2008 - 07:07 PM

It all depends on the flow rate of your valve. The faster the valve opens and the larger the valve opening is, the less air you need. It really is impossible to make reccomendations without knowing the kind of valve you intend to use, except that you can buy an air tank for less than you can make one.
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#3 h2player116

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Posted 16 August 2008 - 07:11 PM

Well I saw something where the tank/air reservoir type object was made out of 3" PVC with end caps on both ends and hole where the air went from a pump.

EDIT: It will release very fast so long as the trigger is held down.

Edited by h2player116, 16 August 2008 - 07:43 PM.

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#4 rork

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Posted 16 August 2008 - 07:52 PM

A 3" pvc firing tank is massive. I urge you to take a look at the directory, especially 3DBBQ's work. Or, you could build a springer; Carbon's SNAP is cheap, simple, and solid, and gets close to 100'; my variation (the SNAPbow) gets a good bit over 100', with some crossbow-inspired stylistic variations (finalized layout is shown at post 13). Overall, though, the classic pump-->tank-->valve-->barrel configuration is a bit passe; it tends to produce massively overpowered blasters with abysmal rates of fire. While such a blaster can be fun and educational to build, it won't help you in a war. Do some research; a lot has been done in this regard. The most commonly-used valves are ball valves, sprinkler valves, and water hose handles. If you make an airgun, I recommend the hose handle; good ones are cheap and reliable, as well as much, much faster than a ball valve.
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<a href="http://nerfhaven.com...howtopic=20296" target="_blank">SNAPbow Mk. V</a>
<a href="http://nerfhaven.com...howtopic=20409" target="_blank">Make it pump-action</a>

#5 CaptainSlug

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Posted 16 August 2008 - 11:21 PM

Assuming the peak flow rate of the valve that connects the tank to the barrel is above 50CFM (@100psi), to fire a dart 100 feet you will need a minimum tank size of 5ci filled at 10-15psi.

Edited by CaptainSlug, 16 August 2008 - 11:22 PM.

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The little critters of nature, they don't know that they're ugly. That's very funny, a fly marrying a bumble bee. I told you I'd shoot, but you didn't believe me. Why didn't you believe me?

#6 h2player116

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 12:25 AM

How can I tell/calculate how much ci's I have?
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#7 rork

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 12:32 AM

Well, you use math; assuming that you're using tubing of a fixed size rather than a flexible bladder,you use the standard, grade-school formula for finding the volume of a cylinder: the radius of the cylinder squared, times pi, times the length of the cylinder. Of course, a quick Google search would have given you the same answer--this is really, really basic stuff.
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<a href="http://nerfhaven.com...howtopic=20296" target="_blank">SNAPbow Mk. V</a>
<a href="http://nerfhaven.com...howtopic=20409" target="_blank">Make it pump-action</a>

#8 h2player116

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 01:36 AM

my bad guys.
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